MFL MarMac Community 4th and 5th Grade

Curriculum


4th Grade  
5th Grade
Special Education

Title I
Music
5th Grade Band
Physical Education
Art
Talented and Gifted
Guidance



4th Grade
Language Arts (Reading, Spelling, and English)

Current Text:  Treasures (Macmillan/McGraw-Hill, 2007)

Our language arts program teaches competence in general skill sand strategies of the reading process.  The program develops understanding, practice and application of the writing process.

Main Topics
Unit I – Let's Explore
Unit II – Take a Stand
Unit III – Making a Difference
Unit IV – Viewpoints
Unit V – Relationships
Unit VI – Discovery

Spelling
Current Text:  Spelling Workbook (Addison-Wesley, 2000)
Students have a weekly spelling test.

English
Current Text:  Grammar Workbook (Addison-Wesley, 2000) and Daily Oral Language PLUS-Level 4 (McDougal, Littell & Company)

Topics Include:
    •    Sentences
    •    Nouns
    •    Verbs
    •    Adjectives and Adverbs
    •    Pronouns and Prepositional Phrases
    •    Sentence Parts and Punctuating Sentences

    Daily Oral Language (D.O.L.):  There is a quiz every week.

Instruction and Grading:  Student’s will be graded on daily work and tests.  Letter grades will be used according to the school’s grading system. 

Math

Current Text:  Expressions  (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)  2009
The math program focuses on helping students make sense of mathematics in meaningful ways using number sense, manipulatives, problem-solving, and basic mathematical operations.

•    Data, Graphs, and Facts Review
•    Place Value and Time
•    Adding and Subtracting Whole Numbers and Money
•    Multiplication and Division Concepts and Facts
•    Multiplying by 1-Digit Factors
•    Multiplying by 2-Digit Factors
•    Dividing by 1-Digit Divisors
•    Using Geometry
•    Fractions and Customary Linear Measurement
•    Fractions Operations and Customary Measurement
•    Decimals and Metric Measurement

Students take 100 fact times tests (6 minutes) for multiplication, and division.  They need 98% accuracy for mastery.  The students are tested each quarter.

Instruction and Grading:  Students will be graded on daily work and tests.  Letter grades will be used according to the school’s grading system. 

Science

Current Text:  Science (Macmillan/McGraw Hill, 2002)

Fourth graders are building the skills of inquiry to solve problems, to evaluate their solutions and to plan and implement their own investigations.

Chapter 1 - From Cell to Ecosystems
Chapter 2 – Plants
Chapter 3 - Describing Animals
Chapter 4 - Life Processes
Chapter 5 - Earth's History
Chapter 6 – Earth’s Surface and Interior
Chapter 7 – Sun, Moon, and Planets
Chapter 8 - Earth's Water
Chapter 9 - Earth's Weather
Chapter 10 – Properties of Matter
Chapter 11 - Changes in Matter
Chapter 12 – Forms of Energy

Instruction and Grading:  Students will be graded on daily work and tests.  Letter grades will be used according to the school’s grading system. 

Social Studies

Current Text:  Our Country’s Regions (Macmillan/McGraw Hill, 2003)

Social Studies is the study of people and the world we live in.  In this course, students will learn how to locate places using map skills.  They will be able to identify and compare the characteristics and features of particular places and regions, such as natural resources, landforms, cultures, and customs.  Fourth grade students will learn the oceans and continents.

Introduction:  The United States: Its Land and People
Unit 1 – The Southwest
Unit 2 – The Southeast
Unit 3 – The Northeast
Unit 4 – The Middle West
Unit 5 – The Mountain States
Unit 6 – The West

Instruction and Grading:  Students will be graded on daily work and tests.  Letter grades will be used according to the school’s grading system. 


5th Grade
Phonics

Current Text:  Fantastic Voyages (Scott Foresman, 2000)

•    Diphthongs
•    Common Word Patterns
•    Vowel Digraphs
•    Silent Consonants
•    r – Controlled Vowels
•    More Complex Word/Spelling Patterns
•    Hard and Soft c and g
•    Silent Consonants
•    Compound Words
•    Base Words
•    Regular Plurals
•    Irregular Plurals
•    Contractions
•    Possessives
•    Inflected Endings
•    Schwa Sound
•    Prefixes
•    Suffixes
•    Syllabication
•    Word Building
•    Complex Spelling Patterns
 
Spelling

Spelling Words with Vowel Sounds with r
Spelling Words with Short e and Long e
Spelling Words with Vowel Sounds in loy and out
Spelling Words with Long Vowels a, i, o, u
Spelling Words with Vowel Sounds in rule, use, off
Spelling Words with Consonant Sounds /j/ and /k/
Spelling Words with kn, mb, gh, st

Spelling Compound Words
Spelling Words with Short Vowels a, i, o, u
Spelling Words with Prefixes dis, un, mid, and pre
Spelling Words with s and es

Spelling Irregular Plurals
Spelling Contractions
Spelling Names of Cities and States
Spelling Possessives
Spelling Homophones

Spelling Words with More Letters than You Expect
Spelling Words with ed, ing, er, and est
Spelling Words with Vowels and No Sound Clues
Spelling Words with Vowels in Final Syllables
Spelling Words with ng, nk, and th
Spelling Words with Suffixes able, ible, ant, and ent
Spelling Words with Suffixes ous, ion, and ation

Spelling Compound Words
Spelling Related Words
Spelling Easily Confused Words
Spelling Words with Just Enough Letters
Spelling Words with Vowels with r
Spelling Words with Letters in the Correct Order
Spelling Related Words

Comprehension

•    Sequence
•    Character
•    Generalizing
•    Cause and Effect
•    Author’s Purpose
•    Steps in a Process
•    Graphic Sources
•    Fact and Opinion
•    Author’s Viewpoint
•    Drawing Conclusions
•    Plot
•    Text Structure
•    Summarizing
•    Compare and Contrast
•    Main Idea and Supporting Details
•    Predicting
•    Context Clues
•    Setting
•    Paraphrasing
•    Visualizing
•    Theme
•    Making Judgements

Grammar

Current Text: Reading (Scott Foresman, 2000)

•    Subjects and Predicates
•    Sentences
•    Sentence Punctuation
•    Four Kinds of Sentences
•    Compound and Complex Sentences
•    Correcting Sentence Fragments and Run-on’s
•    Nouns
•    Proper Nouns
•    Plural Nouns
•    Possessive Nouns
•    Verbs
•    Subject Verb Agreement
•    Verb Tenses
•    Contractions
•    Complete Subjects
•    Adjectives
•    Comparative and Superlative Adjectives
•    Adverbs
•    Pronouns
•    Subject and Object Pronouns
•    Prepositions
•    Prepositional Phrases
•    Conjunctions
•    Proper Adjectives

Writing

Current Text:  Reading (Scott Foresman, 2000)

•    Journaling
•    Capitalization
•    Commons
•    Quotations
•    Quotation Marks
•    Writing Effective Translations
•    Writing Personal Narrative
•    Expanding and Elaborating Sentences
•    Writing Book Reviews
•    Writing a Character Sketch
•    Writing a Friendly Letter
•    Writing a Business Letter
•    Explanatory Paragraphs
•    Topic Sentences
•    Eliminating Wordiness
•    Writing About Cause and Effect
•    Writing Poems
•    Main Ideas with Details
•    Writing a Research Report
•    Writing a Summary
•    Writing a Persuasive Argument

Math

Current Text:  Scott Foresman – Addison Wesley, 2001

I.    Data, Graphs, and Facts Review
    A.    Reading Graphs, Describing Data, and Facts Review
    B.    Making Graphs and Facts Review

II.    Whole Numbers and Decimals: Place Value, Adding, and Subtracting
    A.    Understanding Whole Numbers
    B.    Understanding Decimals
    C.    Adding and Subtracting Whole Numbers and Decimals

III.    Multiplying Whole Numbers and Decimals
    A.    Multiplying with Whole Numbers
    B.    Multiplying with Whole Numbers and Decimals
    C.    Multiplying with Decimals

IV.    Dividing Whole Numbers and Decimals: 1 – Digit Divisors
    A.    Developing Division Number Sense
    B.    Dividing
    C.    Extending Division

V.    2 – Digit Divisors: Whole Numbers and Decimals
    A.    Developing Division Number Sense
    B.    Dividing
    C.    Extending Division

VI.    Geometry
    A.    Exploring Angles and Polygons
    B.    Analyzing Polygons

VII.    Fractions and Mixed Numbers
    A.    Understanding Fractions
    B.    Extending Fraction Understanding

VIII.    Fraction Operations and Customary Linear Measurement
    A.    Adding and Subtracting Fractions
    B.    Adding and Subtracting Mixed Numbers
    C.    Using Customary Linear Measurements

IX.    Fractions and Multiplication
    A.    Developing Fraction Multiplication Sense
    B.    Extending Multiplication

X.    Length, Perimeter, and Area
    A.    Using Linear Metric Measurement
    B.    Exploring Perimeter and Area
    C.    Finding Area and Perimeter

XI.    Measurement
    A.    Understanding Solids and Shapes
    B.    Understanding Weight, Mass, and Temperature
    C.    Understanding Volume and Capacity

XII.    Ratio, Percent, and Probability
    A.    Ratio and Proportion
    B.    Percent
    C.    Probability

Instruction and Grading:  Daily work counts for 60% of grade and tests count for 40% of total grade.

Science

Current Text:  McGraw Hill, 2002

I.    Life Science
    A.    Structures of Plants and Animals
        •    Classifying Living Things
        •    Roots, Stems, and Leaves
        •    The Importance of Plants
        •    Plants Without Seeds
        •    Plants with Seeds
        •    Flowers and Seeds
        •    Plant Responses and Adaptations
    B.    Interactions of Living Things
        •    Living Things and Their Environments
        •    Feed Chains and Food Webs
        •    Cycles of Life

II.    Earth Science
    A.    Earth and Its Resources
        •    Earth and Its Neighbors
        •    Earth’s Changing Crust
        •    Minerals of Earth’s Crust
        •    Earth’s Rocks and Soil
        •    Earth’s Atmosphere
        •    Earth’s Water Supply
        •    Earth’s Oceans
        •    Energy Resources
    B.    Weather and Climate
        •    Atmosphere and Air Temperature
        •    Water Vapor and Humidity
        •    Clouds and Precipitation
        •    Air Pressure and Wind
        •    Air Masses and Fronts
        •    Severe Storms
        •    Climate

III.    Physical Science
    A.    Properties of Matter and Energy
        •    Physical Properties
        •    Elements and Compounds
        •    Solids, Liquids, and Gases
        •    Mixtures and Solutions
        •    Chemical Changes
        •    Acids and Bases
        •    Matter and Energy
    B.    Motion and Energy
        •    Newton’s First Law
        •    Newton’s Second and Third Laws
        •    Newton’s Law of Gravitation
        •    Sound Waves
        •    Pitch and Loudness
        •    Reflection and Absorption

Instruction and Grading:  Student’s will be graded on homework, quizzes and tests.

Social Studies

Current Text:  Our Nation (Macmillan/McGraw Hill, 2003)

I.    The First Americans
    A.    Peopling Western Hemisphere
    B.    Native Americans

II.    Worlds Meet
    A.    Age of Exploration
    B.    Contact and Exploration
    C.    Settlement North America

III.    Colonization and Conflict
    A.    13 English Colonies
    B.    Life in the Colonies
    C.    European Rivalries

IV.    Fight for Independence
    A.    Breaking Ties with Great Britain
    B.    American Revolution
    C.    Constitution of U.S.

V.    Slavery and Emancipation
    A.    Slavery Divides the Nation
    B.    Civil War and Reconstruction

VI.    Our Nation Changes
    A.    The Changing West
    B.    Nation Industrialized

VII.    The Modern Era
    A.    World War I and II
    B.    Depression
    C.    Postwar Years

VIII.    Changing World
    A.    Civil Rights
    B.    The Great Society
    C.    The Cold War Ends

IX.    Western Hemisphere
    A.    Canada
    B.    Mexico
    C.    Central America and the Caribbean
    D.    South America

Instruction and Grading:  Student’s will be graded on homework, quizzes, and tests.


4th and 5th Grade
Special Education Curriculum

Resource Room curriculum materials which are used at the individual’s appropriate level.

Reading:  SRA Reading Mastery (Scott Foresman Focus Series)

Language:  Steck Vaughn Language Exercises

Spelling:  SRA Spelling Mastery (Modern Curriculum Press Spelling Workout)

Math:  Working with Numbers (Steck Vaughn Mastering)


4th & 5th Grade
Title I Curriculum

For the past several years I have used Daily Reading by Grow Publications which focused on reviewing and reinforcing reading skills.  This material covered concepts about print, strategies, phonics, structural analysis, vocabulary, comprehension, listening, and assessment.  I also used The Phonics Game as a resource to reinforce and/or reteach phonetic sounds and decoding.

This year, I am excited about the new series I am using almost exclusively called Reader’s Handbook – A Student Guide for Reading and Learning published by Great Source Education Group, a Houghton Mifflin Company.  This research-based series focuses on reading various kinds of text in real life situations.  I think this material provides a promising comprehensive bridge between Title and reading in the regular classroom to address areas of reading skill deficits.

I.    Introduction

II.    The Reading Process

III.    Reading Know-How

IV.    Reading Textbooks
    •    Reading Social Studies
    •    Reading Science
    •    Reading Math
    •    Focus on Word Problems
    •    Focus on Questions
    •    Elements of Textbooks

V.    Reading Nonfiction
    •    Reading a Magazine Articles
    •    Reading a News Story
    •    Focus on Personal Essays
    •    Focus on Persuasive Writing
    •    Focus on Biography
    •    Focus on Real-World Writing
    •    Elements of Nonfiction

VI.    Reading Fiction
    •    Reading a Folktale
    •    Reading a Novel
    •    Focus on Characters
    •    Focus on Setting
    •    Focus on Dialogue
    •    Focus on Plot
    •    Focus on Theme
    •    Focus on Authors
    •    Elements of Fiction

VII.    Reading Poetry
    •    Reading a Poem
    •    Focus on Language
    •    Focus on Meaning
    •    Focus on Sound and Shape
    •    Elements of Poetry

VIII.    Reading Drama
    •    Reading a Play
    •    Focus on Language
    •    Focus on Theme
    •    Elements of Drama

IX.    Reading on the Internet
    •    Reading a Website
    •    Elements of the Internet

X.    Reading Graphics
    •    Reading Tables and Graphs
    •    Elements of Graphics

XI.    Reading for Tests
    •    Reading a Test and Test Questions
    •    Focus on Writing for Tests
    •    Focus on Math Tests
    •    Focus on Science Tests
    •    Focus on Social Studies Tests

XII.    Improving Vocabulary

Strategy Handbook
•    Close Reading
•    Looking for Cause and Effect
•    Note-Taking
•    Paraphrasing
•    Questioning the Authors
•    Reading Critically
•    Skimming
•    Summarizing
•    Synthesizing
•    Using Graphic Organizers
•    Visualizing and Thinking Aloud

Reading Tools
•    Argument Chart
•    Cause-Effect Organizer
•    Character Development Chart
•    Class and Text Notes
•    Concept Map
•    Critical Reading Chart
•    Double-Entry Journal
•    Fiction Organizer
•    5 W’s and H Organizer
•    Inference Chart
•    Key Word or Topic Notes
•    K-W-L Chart
•    Main Idea Organizer
•    Nonfiction Organizer
•    Paraphrase Chart
•    Plot Diagram
•    Process Notes
•    Storyboard
•    Story Organizer
•    Story String
•    Summary Notes
•    Theme Diagram
•    Thinking Tree
•    Timeline
•    Two Per Line
•    Venn Diagram
•    Web
•    Website Profiler


Music
4th Grade

Key:     I =     Introduce Concept
            D =     Develop Concept
            M =    Master and Maintain Concept
            NA =    Not Applicable until a later age level

Standard 1: Students, alone or with others, sing and/or play instruments using a varied repertoire of music. (National Standards 1 & 2)

A.    Move/sing and/or play music with a steady beat:
    •    Beat/No Beat    M
    •    Beat/Rhythm    D
    •    Strong Beat/Weak Beat    D
B.    Move/sing and/or play demonstrating beginning pitch recognition:
    •    Vocal exploration    M
    •    Speaking/Singing    M
    •    Pitch matching    D
    •    Up/Down    M
    •    High/Low    M
    •    Range    I
    •    Sol-Mi & Sol-Mi-La patterns    M
    •    Sol-Mi-La-Do-Re and Mi-Re-Do patterns    M
    •    High Do, Low Sol and low La patterns    D
    •    Fa and Ti patterns   I
    •    Echo sing/clap 2, 4, and 8 beat patterns    M
    •    Step/skip/repeat    D
    •    Pentatonic scale    D
 C.    Sing and/or play using correct posture, breathing, and vocal and instrumental production techniques:
    •    Warm-ups    D
    •    Sing with correct posture/breathing/clear diction    D
    •    Play using correct posture/breathing    I
    •    Care of the voice    D
    •    Care of the instrument    D
D.     Move/sing and/or play expressively with appropriate dynamics, tempo, phrasing, and interpretation:
    •    Same/Different phrases    D
    •    Grade appropriate performance skills, vocal and/or instrumental    D
    •    Fast/Slow    M
    •    Loud/Soft (forte=f / piano=p)    M
    •    Getting faster/slower    M
    •    Getting louder/softer    M
    •    Pianissimo (pp), Fortissimo (ff), Mezzo piano (mp), Mezzo forte (mf), Accelerando (acc.), Ritardando (rit.)    I
E.     Perform easy rhythmic, melodic, and chordal patterns accurately on rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic classroom instruments:
    •    Melodic percussion    D
    •    Rhythmic percussion    D
    •    Short/Long    M
    •    4 & 8 beat patterns using grade appropriate rhythmic and melodic patterns    D
    •    Autoharps, keyboards, bells, or barred instruments    D
    •    Tonic chord accompaniments    M
    •    Guitars and keyboards    I
    •    Soprano recorders, using the notes B,A,G, low E, and low D (other pitches optional)    I
    •    Two chord accompaniments (I-V, I-V7, I-IV)    D
F.     Sing/play ostinati, partner songs, and rounds:
    •    Melodic & rhythmic ostinati using speech/body percussion/singing/movement/instruments    D
    •    2-part rounds (vocal/instrumental/movement)    D
    •    Partner songs    D
    •    3-part speech and vocal rounds    I
G.    Respond to conducting cues:
    •    Watch the conductor    D
    •    Start/Stop    D
    •    Dynamic changes    D
    •    Tempo changes    D
H.    Sing/play music representing various cultures and styles:
    •    Suggested repertoire: languages of the world, varied modes, including major & minor, varied meter, quality text, varied styles, cultures of the world    D
I.     Demonstrate beginning ensemble skills:
    •    Keep together    D
    •    Listen    D
    •    Accompaniment    D
    •    Maintain assigned part (speak/play/sing/move)    D
    •    Balance of parts    D
J.    Participate in a variety of musical ensembles:
    •    Vary size and type of ensemble experiences, including vocal (sing and speak), instrumental and movement    D

Standard 2: Students read and notate music. (National Standard 5)

A.    Identify and read rhythmic patterns using whole, half, dotted half, quarter, eighth notes and rests:
    •    Iconic notation (ta, ti-ti, etc.)    M
    •    Short/Long    M
    •    Quarter note, double eighth notes, quarter rest    M
    •    Half note, dotted half note, half rest    M
    •    Whole note, whole rest, eighth note, eighth rest    D
    •    Syncopation    I
B.    Read and notate simple melodic and rhythmic patterns using traditional, and when appropriate, nontraditional music notation:
    •    High/Low and Up/down    M
    •    Melodic contour    D
    •    Bar Lines    M
    •    Double bar lines    M
    •    Repeat signs    M
    •    Staff   M
    •    Line notes/Space notes    D
    •    Sol-Mi patterns    M
    •    Sol-Mi-La and Sol-Mi-Do patterns    M
    •    Me-Re-Do patterns   M
    •    Hi Do, low La and Sol    D
    •    Pentatonic scale    D
    •    Letter name identification of lines/spaces of treble clef   I
    •    Musical alphabet   I
    •    Skip/step/repeat    I
    •    Tie   I
C.    Identify symbols and traditional terms that refer to dynamics, tempo, form and meter:
    •    Loud/Soft and Fast/Slow    M
    •    Introduction    M
    •    Getting louder/Getting softer    M
    •    Verse/Chorus (refrain)    M
    •    Piano (p) / Forte (f)    D
    •    Pianissimo  (pp) / Fortissimo (ff) / Mezzo piano (mp) / Mezzo forte (mf)    I
    •    Time Signature    D
    •    4/4, 2/2, 3/4 meters    D
    •    Crescendo/Decrescendo markings    I
    •    Accelerando (acc.) / Ritardando (rit.)    I
    •    1st and 2nd endings    I
    •    Coda    I
D.    Explore current music technology:
    •    As available   M

Standard 3: Students create music. (National Standards 3 & 4)

A.    Explore and express musical ideas through movement, singing, and playing instruments:
    •    Vocal sounds, body percussion, environmental sounds, unpitched instruments, pitched classroom instruments    M
    •    Musical opposites using movement    M
    •    Autoharp/keyboard/guitar    M
    •    Pentatonic scale    D
    •    Soprano recorder    I
B.    Create simple rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic patterns:
    •    Question and answer phrases    M
    •    Sol-Mi and Sol-Mi-La patterns    M
    •    Sol-Mi-Do and Mi-Re-Do patterns    M
    •    High Sol and low La patterns    D
    •    Fa and Ti    I
    •    Quarter note, double eighth notes, quarter rest, half note, half rest, whole note, whole rest, dotted half note    D
    •     Eighth note, eighth rest, eighth/quarter/eighth notes    I
C.    Create short compositions within a given framework:
    •    Musical opposites    M
    •    Rhythmic and melodic phrases appropriate to grade    M
    •    Improvisation activities    M
    •    Pentatonic scale    D
    •    Sets of 4, 2, and  3    D
    •    ABA form    D
    •    Rondo form    I
D.    Create short compositions using a variety of sound sources:
    •    Appropriate identified sound sources    M
 
Standard 4: Students listen to, respond to, analyze, evaluate and describe  music. (NationalStandards 6 & 7)

A.    Respond to/describe music in a variety of ways:
    •    Visual arts (e.g. shapes, colors, pictures)    M
    •    Movement (including free movement/singing/games/dances)    D
    •    Language    D
    •    Drama    M
    •    Manipulatives    M
    •    Silent listening    D
    •    Internal “pictures”    D
B.    Listen to a variety of musical styles and genres:
    •    Relate to classroom units    M
    •    Such as, but not limited to recorded and/or live performances of jazz, folk, patriotic, classical (for example: opera, ballet, symphony) pop, country, world music, electronic and musical theater    D
C.    Listen to, identify and describe simple musical forms:
    •    Same/Different    M
    •    Introduction    M
    •    AB and ABA    M
    •    Verse and chorus (refrain)    M
    •    Round, Canon    D
    •    Rondo    I
    •    Coda    I
D.    Identify musical elements and expressive qualities using  appropriate musical vocabulary:
    •    Beat/No Beat    M
    •    Up/Down    M
    •    High/Low    M
    •    Soft/Loud    M
    •    Fast/Slow    M
    •    Short/Long   M
    •    Same/Different    M
    •    Grade appropriate rhythms    D
    •    Introduction    M
    •    Getting louder/Getting softer    M
    •    Getting faster/Getting slower    M
    •    Meter sets of 4, 2, and 3    D
    •    Skip/Step/Repeat    I
    •    Variations in dynamics and tempo    I
    •     Major/Minor    I
    •    Coda    I
    •    Soprano/alto/tenor/bass (vocal and instrumental)    I
    •    Melody alone/ melody with harmony    I
E.    Describe contrasts of timbre:
    •    How sounds are made    M
    •    Vibration    M
    •    Longer and larger = lower    M
    •    Environmental sounds = M
    •    Vocal (mouth) sounds    M
    •    Body percussion    D
    •    Families of instruments: Strings, Woodwinds, Brass, Percussion    M
    •    Group by: sound, material, what or how sound starts, what vibrates (e.g. strike, shake, scrape, blow, pluck)    M
    •    Pitched/Unpitched    M
    •    Culturally diverse instruments (World instruments)    M
    •    Orchestras/Bands    D
    •     Acoustic/electronic    I
F.    Evaluate musical works and performances using simple criteria:
    •    Quality judgments based on grade appropriate criteria    D
G.    Demonstrate appropriate audience behavior:
    •    In class, in performance, in assemblies, in audience    D
    •    Concert performance expectations    D
    •    Audience expectations    D
 
Standard 5: Students understand music in relation to history and a variety of cultures. (National Standard 9)

A.    Participate in cultural activities in an appropriate manner:
    •    Participate in an appropriate manner    D
B.    Elements of music:
    •    Identify how elements of music are used in examples from various cultures    D
C.    Identify the role of music and musicians in various cultures, using a variety of music resources, such as, but not limited to: live music, recorded music, the Internet and CD-ROMs:
    •    Build a listening and performing repertoire using music of own culture(s) as well as music of the world    D
    •    Focus: Classrooms/school/family/city/state/nation/world    M
    •    Such as but not limited to: lullabies, marches, patriotic music, greetings/farewells, story music, work songs, party music, games, singing games, seasonal music, rhymes/chants, nature, animals, dances, nonsense/humor, adventures    M
    •    Holidays and celebrations     M
    •    Integrate Standard 5 with singing, playing, creating, and listening standard    M
    •    Identify the roles of a musician: creator, performer, listener, evaluator, conductor    D
    •    Listen to and perform music from varied time periods    D 

Standard 6: Students understand relationships between music, the other arts, and disciplines outside the arts. (National Standard 8)

A.    Identify the fine arts:
    •    Name the fine arts disciplines (music, art, dance, theatre)    M
    •    Explore the disciplines    D
B.    Identify similarities and differences in the meanings of common terms used in the various fine arts:
    •    Improvisation    D
    •    Form  (e.g.: AB, ABA, Call & Response, canon)    D
    •    Style    D
    •    Expression    D
    •    Warm-up    D
    •    Movement    D
    •    Theme    I
    •    Elements (e.d.: rhythm, harmony, texture, line, shape)    I
C.    Demonstrate an awareness of music as a part of everyday life:
    •    Demonstrate an awareness of music as a part of everyday life    M
D.    Principles and subject matter of other school disciplines: 
    •    Identify ways in which the principles and subject matter of other school disciplines are interrelated with those of music    M

Grading:  Students will be assessed on daily behavior and participation, proficiency tests on recorder, guitar, and keyboard, and written worksheets or tests covering curriculum topics.  These assessments will be used to determine if the student is doing satisfactory (S) or unsatisfactory (U).  This final assessment of S or U will be posted on their quarterly report card.

Music
5th Grade

Key:     I =     Introduce Concept
            D =     Develop Concept
            M =    Master and Maintain Concept
            NA =    Not Applicable until a later age level

Standard 1: Students, alone or with others, sing and/or play instruments using a varied repertoire of music. (National Standards 1 & 2)

A.    Sing and/or play music in two or more parts using literature of progressive difficulty:
    •    Sing and/or play an individual part with a contrasting part    I
    •    Sing and play descants and counter melodies    I
    •    Perform 3 and 4 part movement, speech, vocal and instrumental rounds    I
    •    Perform beginning chordal harmony    D
B.    Demonstrate knowledge of proper breathing techniques, tone production, and body and instrument position:
    •    Use both vocal and instrumental warm-ups    D
    •    Sing with correct posture, correct breathing, clear diction    D
    •    Play using correct posture, correct breathing, and mallet technique    D
    •    Demonstrate care of the voice, including the changing voice     D 
    •    Demonstrate care of the instrument     D
C.    Sing and/or play with expression and technical accuracy:
    •    Select appropriate range – the lowest and highest notes employed by a song    I
    •    Perform slur, staccato, legato    I
D.     Sing and/or play an expanding repertoire of music representing diverse culture, genres, and styles:
    •    Include: languages of the world, cultures of the world, quality text, varied modes including major and minor, varied meter, varied styles, varied genres    D
E.     Perform more complex rhythmic, melodic, and chordal patterns accurately on     rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic instruments:
    •    Melodic percussion instruments     I
    •    Rhythmic percussion instruments    I
    •    Guitars and keyboard instruments    I
    •    12 bar blues, I-IV-V7 in appropriate keys, multi-chord accompaniments    I
    •    Major/minor/pentatonic scales    I
F.     Respond to conducting cues with increased awareness of musical elements such as tempo, dynamics, and style:
    •    Watch the conductor for phrasing and expressive elements    D
G.    Demonstrate improving ensemble skills:
    •    Maintain common beat, rhythm, and tempo    D
    •    Maintain a balance of parts    D  
    •    Listen to own and others’ parts    D
    •    Maintain assigned part (speak, play, sing, and move)    D

Standard 2: Students read and notate music. (National Standard 5)

A.    Identify and read rhythmic patterns using whole, half, dotted half, dotted quarter, quarter, eighth, triplet eighth notes, sixteenth notes, and rests in varied meter signatures:
    •    Add dotted quarter note, dotted quarter-eighth note, dotted quarter-eighth rest, four sixteenth notes    I
    •    Add pick-up notes    I
B.    Identify, read, and notate melodic and rhythmic patterns using current music technology, traditional and, when appropriate,
nontraditional music notation:
    •    Add fa and ti    I
    •    Use diatonic scale in the keys of C, F, and G    I
    •    Read from a score of two or more staves    NA
C.    Identify the notes on a staff using the appropriate clef:
    •    Identify the roles of ledger lines    I
    •    Add bass clef lines and spaces    NA
    •    Identify the grand staff    NA
D.    Identify sharp signs, flat signs, natural signs, and keys signatures, and their functions in music being performed:
    •    Identify accidentals    I
    •    Distinguish between half and whole steps    I
    •    Identify C, F, and G key signatures    I
E.    Identify and apply symbols and traditional terms that refer to dynamics, tempo, meter, form and articulation:
    •    Add DaCapo al Fine (D.C. al Fine) and Dal Segno (D.S.)    I
    •    Add slur, staccato, legato    I
    •    Add largo, andante, moderato, allegro, presto    I

Standard 3: Students create music. (National Standards 3 & 4)

A.    Express musical ideas using a variety of sound sources:
    •    Appropriate identified sound sources    M
B.    Create short compositions or arrangements using rhythmic, melodic, and/or harmonic patterns:
    •    Include frameworks such as, but not limited to: chromatic scale, pentatonic scale, diatonic scale, the keys of C, F, and G, 12 bar blues, I-IV-V7 chords in keys of C, F, and G, grade appropriate rhythms, and familiar forms    I
C.    Improvise rhythmic, melodic, and/or harmonic patterns:
    •    Use grade appropriate rhythms, chord, scales and forms   M

Standard 4: Students listen to, respond to, analyze, evaluate and describe  music. (NationalStandards 6 & 7)

A.    Listen to and identify a variety of musical styles and genres:
    •    Such as, but not limited to recorded and/or live performances of jazz, 12 bar blues, folk, patriotic, classical (including opera, ballet, symphony) pop, country, world music, electronic and musical theater    D
B.    Listen to, identify and describe simple musical forms:
    •    Theme and Variations    I
    •    12 bar blues     NA
C.     Identify more advanced musical elements and expressive qualities using     appropriate musical vocabulary:
    •    Expand musical vocabulary into new and varied genres and styles     NA
D.    Describe and respond to specific music events within a given work:
    •    Include bridges, instrumental interludes, and meter changes     I
E.    Describe contrasts of timbre:
    •    Include instruments combined in different ways to form a variety of ensembles     I
F.    Evaluate musical works and performances using expanding criteria:
    •    Include quality and effectiveness of performance    M
    •    Include personal responses to performance    M
    •    Use appropriate musical vocabulary    M
G.    Demonstrate appropriate audience behavior:
    •    Include the following situations: in class, in performance, during assemblies, and as part of an audience    D

Standard 5: Students understand music in relation to history and a variety of cultures. (National Standard 9)

A.    Participate in cultural activities:
    •    Participate in an appropriate manner    D
B.    Elements of music:
    •    Identify how elements of music are used in examples from various cultures    D
C.    Identify the role of music and musicians in various cultures, using a variety of music resources, such as, but not limited to: live music, recorded music, the Internet and CD-ROMs:
    •    Integrate Standard 5 with singing, playing, creating, and listening standard    M
    •    Listen to and perform music from varied time periods    D
    •    Compare and contrast the use of musical elements (such as, but not limited to: melody, rhythm, timbre, harmony, form, texture, vocal style, instrumental style) in music from different cultures    NA
    •    Listen to and perform music from varied time periods    NA

Standard 6: Students understand relationships between music, the other arts, and disciplines outside the arts. (National Standard 8) 

A.    Identify the fine arts:
    •    Explore the disciplines    D
B.    Identify similarities and differences in the meanings of common terms used in the various fine arts:
    •    Form    M
    •    Style    M
    •    Improvisation    D
    •    Expression    D
    •    Elements (i.e.: rhythm, harmony, texture, line, shape)    D
    •    Theme    D
    •    Warm-up    D
    •    Movement    D
C.    Fine arts reflect the culture:
    •    Demonstrate an understanding that the fine arts often reflect the culture in which they were created    I

Grading:  Students will be assessed on daily behavior and participation, proficiency tests on recorder, guitar, and keyboard, and written worksheets or tests covering curriculum topics.  These assessments will be used to determine if the student is doing satisfactory (S) or unsatisfactory (U).  This final assessment of S or U will be posted on their quarterly report card.



FIFTH GRADE BAND

Students in fifth grade have the opportunity to begin the study of a band instrument.  Instruction begins in like instrument groups for the first two or three lessons, but individual lessons are scheduled from that point on.  Each student will have a lesson at least once each cycle.

Beginning band students use the lesson book Standard of Excellence by Bruce Pearson, with the exception of percussionists, who use the Performing Percussionist Series by James Coffin.

Fifth grade students begin rehearsing as a band at the beginning of October.  They rehearse together at least once each cycle.  Students begin by playing unison and duet material, primarily from the lesson book.  In December, they begin to play actual band music.  Music is selected that coordinates with skills students are learning in lessons.  In addition, students learn to count rests and play independent parts with a balanced sound.

Main Areas of Concentration
    1. Play with proper embouchure, and tone quality characteristic of instrument
    2. Expand range of notes learned
    3. Understand and learn to play fundamental rhythms (whole, half, and quarter notes and rests, eighth notes, dotted quarter notes)
    4. Learn to tongue and slur correctly
    5. Develop concept of a band sound
    6. Begin introduction to expressive playing-dynamics, phrasing, tempo
    7. Be able to play more challenging music within the ensemble as the year progresses

Concerts

Fifth grade band students perform three concerts during the school year.  They play an informal concert in late November for the fourth and fifth grade students and teachers.  This is held during the school day and parents are also invited.  They also perform at the Bandorama in February and at the Fourth and Fifth Grade concert in May.

Evaluation

Written progress reports are sent home at the end of each quarter.  In addition, parents are encouraged to call or stop at school any time they have questions or concerns about their child’s progress.  Communication is vital in helping students learn the many new skills involved in playing an instrument.



Physical Education

Physical education is included in our general education and because of this it makes a unique contribution to a child’s value system.  Physical education's uniqueness lies in the potential to develop and enhance the psychomotor domain.  Associated cognitive and affective goals should also be integrated into the overall program.
         
Physiologically, we need a vigorous and dynamic program to develop fitness.  In doing this we also need pleasure.  We need movement competence which helps us develop our body management skills.  In this we need divergent movement activities featured exploration, and choice.  Fundamental and specialized skills are learned through convergent, or focused, movement activity.
      
In developing this fitness students should understand why they are doing what they are doing.  Skill development should feature not only the how but also the why.  In the cognitive area, associated learning should accompany the development of physical traits.
      
All students have a right to reach their potential and the curriculum must provide opportunity for such achievement.  Taking into account that all students are starting at a different point, students should move at a pace that is challenging, educationally sound, and capable of enhancing their development.  In other words, all students are expected to improve on their starting points.
      
Achieving physical success plays a big role in developing a positive self-concept and if a student does this is better adjusted to school life.

The big change in the program from the primary grade students to the intermediate grade students is the shift to more emphasis on specialized skills and sports activities with emphasis on quality of movement and correctness of patterns.  Physical fitness and developmental activities are started.  The Presidential Physical Fitness testing is introduced.  Routines are offered so that students can see what they need to do to maintain their fitness levels.  After students learn the necessary skills and participate in lead-up games, they move into the sports program.  It is here that students learn to enjoy the rigors of competition.

4th/5th Grade Physical Education Curriculum

    4th Grade-Yearly Percentage of Time for Each Activity

    Movement experiences and body mechanics-9%

    Rhythmic activities-18%

    Apparatus, stunts, tumbling, combatives-18%

    Simple game activities and relays-17%

    Sports skills and activities-35%

    Administration and testing-3%

    5th Grade-Yearly Percentage of Time for Each Activity

    Movement experiences and body mechanics-9%

    Rhythmic activities-18%

    Apparatus, stunts, tumbling, combatives-18%

    Simple game activities and relays-12%

    Sports skills and activities-40%

    Administration and testing-3%

A short period of time at the beginning of each class period usually is devoted to fitness activities. This consists of laps, calisthenics, stretches, and more laps.

4th/5th Grade Major Units/Lesson

    Volleyball-Rules of game, rotation, serving, team work.   
                 -Beach ball is used.

    Presidential physical fitness testing-Fall/Spring.
              -Five areas (sit-ups, sit and reach, chin-ups, shuttle
                run and mile run)

    Gymnastics-Stunts and tumbling.

    Roller Skating-Learning to skate forwards and backwards.
            -Trying skilled activities while skating.
            -Playing games.

    Hockey-Learning to dribble around cones, etc.
                 -Learning the rules of the game.
                 -Doing lead up games like line hockey and two on one.   

    Basketball-Fundamentals of passing, shooting, and lay ups.
                 -Lead up games (Roster, knockout, relays, etc.)
                 -Games (3X3, 4X4, 5X5, boy/boy, girl/girl, then mixed)

    Softball-Whiffleball-Rules of game.
                -Fundamentals of batting.

    Jump for Heart-Jump Rope contest-Learn about heart disease.
                -Watch videos of different ways to jump rope.
   
    Soccer-Dribbling the ball, etc.
                -Teamwork
                -Rules of the game.

    Dancing-Learning of some basic modern dances.

Other activities that aren’t units but included in the curriculum:

    -Bean Bag Games, Timed track obstacle course, scooter boards, fitness bracelet workout, mixed stations, games: cat and rat, crows and crones, dodge ball, rodeo ball, color tag, midnight, pac man, and inside/outside kickball.

Students are assessed as to how good they can perform the task on hand, taking into account each students starting point. 
   
Progression needs to be made from each student’s starting point.
   

Art

The 4th and 5th grade art curriculum is based on the following standards from theNational Standards for Arts Education. 

Students will:

Understand and apply media, techniques and processes.
Use elements and principles of design.
Choose and evaluate a range of subject matter symbols and ideas.
Understand the visual arts in relation to history and cultures.
Reflect upon the merits of their work and the work of others.
Make connections between visual arts and other disciplines.

To meet these standards students will:

Use a variety of media in both 2 and 3 dimensional projects.
Identify specific elements and principles of design in each project and record these terms in an art folder. 
Use a checklist to evaluate their own work. 
Practice oral critiques of the work of others. 
View artwork from different time periods and cultures.
Display their artwork.



TAG Thinking Skills
Elementary

Thinking skills small group work involves a lot of open ended questions, research, reading, working on own, following direction, being responsible learners, and stretching well beyond grade level work.

Fifth graders look closely at themselves and their interest and create a project.  Also, we do a large research project on Ancient Egypt, look closely at Sherlock Holmes, codes, and decoding.  This work involves the following skills: listening, discussing, research, deductive thinking, complexity, flexibility, elaboration, and risk taking.

Fourth graders create their own rules for the group, researches and writes an autobiography to develop knowledge of self and explore family influences.  Students also look closely at various ways people can, do, and have communicated.  Some of the skills involved include analyze, evaluate, elaborate, fluency, complexity, curiosity, and risk-taking.

Third graders and second graders work in enrichment groups, which consist of students who are reading above grade level.  They are challenged to expand their comprehension, research, writing, creativity and critical thinking skills.  As well as build a love of reading that lasts a lifetime.  The material accompanies the regular Scott Foresman text book.

First graders work in small groups and may be enriched in thinking, reading, writing, and/or creativity with a variety of challenging, stimulating activities.

Kindergarten students meet in small groups to experience language enrichment.  The story mat activities give students practice in listening, following direction, thinking and speaking.

Instruction & Grading:
Each of the 7 to 10 lessons given in 4th and 5th grade Whole Room Thinking Skills emphasizes the teaching of one specific Thinking Skill for students to practice on their own.

The 2nd through 5th grade students work in small group enrichment and use a Rubric or matrix or answer questions to self evaluate their work.  Teacher evaluation is either written or oral.



4th Grade Guidance:

August/December
Review the 7 pillars of character (Trustworthy, Respect, Responsibility, Fairness, Caring and Citizenship).   Role play how different different situations involving the pillars of characters and how students should behave, demonstrating character. If developmental issues come up, guidance class will deviate from the topic to teach lessons in the prevention of the problem areas.

January/May
Students learn the 16 Social Skills for upper elementary from School-Social-Skills-At-A Glance.  Each social skill involves practicing through role playing each of the 16 skills.  To assess the students, each are randomly asked to demonstrate skills during the last classes.

5th Grade Guidance:

August/November
Students review the Social Skills-at-a-Glance and are asked to demonstrate without use of the sheets.  December to May, Students focus on thinking before they act using the Thinking, Changing, Rearranging program, by Jill Anderson, Timberline Press.  Lessons include identifying what causes feelings, how our beliefs cause irrational and rational feelings, how our language causes feelings that promote poor behavior, how identify and change irrational beliefs that harm us and how to change our  language to promote healthy feelings and better behavioral choices. Students are assessed by again practicing skills and evaluating if those skills are being internalized.