MFL MarMac Community Middle School's

Curriculum


6th Grade
    Language Arts
    Math
    Science
    Iowa History
    Geography
    Physical Education
    Computer Applications
    Art
    Band
    Music
    Resource Language I
    Resource Language II
    Resource Literature
    Resource Mathematics
7th Grade
   Language Arts
    Literature
    Creative Writing
    Math
    Transitional Math
    Life Science
    Civics
    Careers Exploratory
    Physical Education
    Life Skills 
    Drama 
    Art 
    Instrumental Music
    Middle School Chorus
    General Music
    Resource Language I
    Resource Language II
    Resource Literature
    Resource Mathematics
8th Grade
    Language Arts
    Oral Communication and Literature
    Algebra
    Transitional Math (Pre-Algebra)
    General Math
    Science
    Environmental Science
    Health
    American History
    World Cultures Exploratory
    Introductory Spanish
    Careers Exploratory
    Physical Education
    Art
    Instrumental Music
    Middle School Chorus
    General Music
    Resource Language I
    Resource Language II
    Resource Literature
    Resource Mathematics



 
6th Grade


Language Arts
6th Grade

This is a class designed to prepare students in reading and writing.

Current Text:  Houghton Mifflin – English, 1995

Main Topics:

1.    Spelling
    A.    Three different levels of spelling books are used in the classroom.

2.    Vocabulary
    A.    Words are taken from novels that are read in class.

3.    Mechanics and Usage
    A.    Students practice mechanics and usage through Daily Oral Language and worksheets taken from an English textbook.

4.    Writing Projects
    A.    Creative writing
    B.    Letter writing
    C.    Journal writing
    D.    Christmas around the world unit
    E.    Poetry unit
    F.    Scrapbook unit
    G.    Iowa history unit
    H.    Story writing unit

Instruction and Grading:  Students’ will be graded on homework, quizzes and tests.


Math
6th Grade

This course is designed to prepare students for high school math.  The content includes preparation for pre-algebra, algebra and geometry.

Current Text:  Middle School Math Course I (Scott Foresman-Addison Wesley, 1999)

Main Topics:

1.    Statistics
    A.    Reading and interpreting graphs
    B.    Displaying data
    C.    Describing data

2.   Connecting Arithmetic to Algebra
    A.    Making sense of large numbers
    B.    Number sense and operation sense
    C.    Introduction to algebra

3.    Decimals
    A.    Decimal concepts
    B.    Adding and subtracting with decimals
    C.    Multiplying and dividing with decimals

4.    Measurement
    A.    Units of measurement
    B.    Area of polygons
    C.    Circles

5.    Patterns and Number Theory
    A.    Number theory
    B.    Connecting fractions and decimals

6.    Adding and Subtracting Fractions
    A.    Adding and subtracting fractions
    B.    Adding and subtracting mixed numbers

7.    Multiplying and Dividing Fractions
    A.    Multiplying fractions
    B.    Dividing fractions

8.    The Geometry of Polygons
    A.    Lines and Angels
    B.    Polygons
    C.    Transformations

Instruction and Grading:  Students’ will be graded on homework, quizzes and tests.  Students are expected to attain at least 60% of the total possible points to pass 6th grade math.


Science
6th Grade

Main Topics:

1.    Life Science
    A.    Activities of Cells
        •    Life process of living things
        •    Cell structure and function
        •    How cells reproduce
        •    Variety of living things

    B.    Flowering Plants
        •    Transporting materials
        •    Making and using food
        •    Producing seeds
        •    Growth of new plants

    C.    How Living Things Interact
        •    Living things and energy
        •    Transfer of energy among living things
        •    Cycle sin an ecosystem
        •    Populations

    D.    Life in the Oceans
        •    The different oceans
        •    Living things of the inter-tidal zone
        •    Animals of the shallow-ocean zone
        •    Animals of the open-ocean zone
        •    Protecting the ocean

    E.    Evolution
        •    Evidence of life of the past
        •    Change of living things over time
        •    Charles Darwin
        •    The process of change
        •    Extinct species

2.    Physical Science
    A.    Elements and Compounds
        •    Atoms
        •    Elements
        •    Compounds
        •    Acids, bases, and salts

    b.    Chemical and Nuclear Changes
        •    Chemical changes
        •    Use of chemical changes
        •    Changes in the nucleus
        •    Nuclear fusion and fission

    C.    Light
        •    Electromagnet spectrum
        •    Behavior of light
        •    Mirrors and lenses
        •    Seeing colors

    D.    Sound
        •    Visible energy
        •    Sound waves
        •    Behavior of sound
        •    Uses of sound

    E.    Electrical Energy
        •    Charges and circuits
        •    Production of electricity
        •    Uses of electrical energy
        •    Computers and microchips

3.    Earth Science
    A.    Movement of the Earth’s Plates
        •    Origin of the earth
        •    Moving continents
        •    Earthquakes
        •    Volcanoes
        •    Mountain building

    B.    Weather and Climate
        •    Weather
        •    Moving air
        •    Technology and weather
        •    Climate
        •    Changing climates

    C.    Beyond the Solar System
        •    Distances in space
        •    Observing stars
        •    Characteristics of stars
        •    Stars in motion
        •    Exploring space

4.    Human Body
    A.    Growth and Development
        •    Reproduction
        •    Individual development
        •    Stages of growth
        •    DNA and genetic information

    B.    Body Systems
        •    The body at sleep
        •    The body awake
        •    The body in action
        •    The body defenses

Instruction and Grading:  Students are graded on homework, quizzes and tests.  Homework is 40% of their overall grade with quizzes and test 60% overall.  Students are expected to maintain an average grade of 60% in both categories in order to pass.


Iowa History
6th Grade
 

Students will be able to complete a long-range project with little direction from the teacher.  Students will be able to research a given topic.  Students will expand their background on the long history of Iowa.  Students will have to manage their time.

Current Text:  Iowa Notebook

The Iowa Notebook Project is a very worthwhile assignment to students.  This is one of the more challenging projects that our students will do during their middle school year.  The students will be required to do at least 15 Iowa Notebook Projects; some of these projects are required by the teacher.  Others are projects, which the students can choose to do.  Any projects over 15 will be considered extra credit.

All of the required projects will be accompanied with a help sheet which will give the students the criteria needed to get a good grade.  Students will be required to use help sheets on all required projects.

Students will have the opportunity to redo any projects that they are not satisfied with the grade.  Students will only get one more opportunity to redo a project.  The teacher will make sure to give the students the areas they need to improve on to get a good grade.

Many projects and reports are suggested in this guide.  You can choose these for your non-required projects or you can come up with a project invention on your own.  Make sure you get prior approval and check with your teacher before you start any projects which are of your own invention.

The Iowa Notebook Project is a required project to pass the 2nd semester of 6th grade Social Studies.  Anyone who does not complete this project will need to repeat the 2nd semester of 6th grade social studies.

Course Rational:  The Iowa History curriculum is designed to illuminate Iowa’s past and to provide students with a deeper understanding and appreciation of their state’s history.

Course Description:  Iowa History is a one semester, co-ed course available to all sixth graders.  The study of Iowa History will help make many of the challenges that the students will face throughout their life easier to understand and to deal with.

Course Goals:  The student appreciates the sacrifice our ancestors made to settle this land called Iowa.  The student appreciates their role as an American citizen and a native of Iowa.  The student will help preserve their environment for future generations.

Main Topics:

1.    Orientation (Day 1)
    A.    Course Rational and Content
    B.    Teacher Expectations
    C.    Classroom Procedures

2.    Iowa Past to Present (The People and the Prairie) (7 weeks)
    A.    Changing Land
    B.    American Indians
    C.    Many Flags Over Iowa
    D.    Pioneers on the Prairie
    E.    Pioneers Life on the Prairie
    F.    Rivers, Trails and Train Tracks
    G.    A Nation Divided
    H.    Settlers from Many Lands

3.    Past to Present (Part II) (7 weeks)
    A.    Providing a Government
    B.    Schools for a New State
    C.    Keeping the Faith on the Frontier
    D.    Experiments in Community Living
    E.    Life on the Farm – Iowa Style
    F.    New Inventions Bring Change
    G.    Business and Industry in Iowa
    H.    World War II and Hard Time After
    I.    Depression, Changing Times, and World War II
    J.    The Story Continues

4.    The Iowa Heritage (2 weeks)
    A.    First People of the Prairies
    B.    The Tall Grass Whispers
    C.    The Path to Statehood
    D.    The Prairie Pioneers
    E.    The Civil War
    F.    From Here to There
    G.    Come to Iowa
    H.    Three Communities of Belief
    I.    The Iowa Country School
    J.    Main Street
    K.    Industrial Roots
    L.    Roots in the Soil
    M.    Hard Times
    N.    Iowa Impression
    O.    The Coming Heritage

5.    Sites and Sounds of Historic Iowa (2 weeks)
    A.    Everyday Heroes
    B.    Listen to the Land
    C.    Pioneers
    D.    From Many Roots
    E.    Town Builders
    F.    The Urban Frontier

Student Assessment (Grading):
Class participation, conduct and attitude, daily work, and terms test over chapters.


Geography
6th Grade

Course Rational:  Although social studies is a multidisciplinary subject, geography is part of the core of middle school social studies instruction.  A solid understanding of geography is an essential part of a sound learning experience in social studies.

Course Description:  Geography is an eighteen-week, co-ed course available to all sixth graders.  The course is designed to help students cope with their environment.

Course Goals:  The student appreciates their role in the environment.  The student understands their responsibilities as a consumer in the environment in which they live.

Main Topics:

1.    Orientation (Day 1)
    A.    Course Rational and Content
    B.    Teacher Expectations
    C.    Classroom Procedures

2.    Unit I – Portrait of a Planet (4 weeks)
    A.    Looking at Earth
        •    Study Earth
        •    Earth – A Body in Space
        •    Oceans and Continents
    B.    Forms of the Land
        •    Mountains
        •    Hills
        •    Plateaus
        •    Plains

    C.    The Shaping of Earth’s Crust
        •    Building up Earth
        •    Wearing Down Earth
        •    Coastline Change

    D.    Earth’s Water
        •    The Water Cycle
        •    Ocean Waters
        •    Rivers
        •    Lakes and Groundwater

3.    Unit 2 – Patterns in the Atmosphere (3 weeks)
    A.    Weather
        •    Earth’s Atmosphere
        •    Feather of Weather
        •    Air Pressure, Wind and Water
        •    Weather Package

    B.    What Determines Climate
        •    Climate and the Sun
        •    Climate and Altitude
        •    Land, Water and Climate

    C.    Climate Regions
        •    The Low-Latitude Climate Regions
        •    The Low Latitude Climate Regions
        •    The High-Latitude Climate Regions

4.    Unit 3 – The Living Earth (2 weeks)
    A.    The Life Support System
        •    Earth is a System
        •    Soil
        •    The World of Plants

    B.    Plant and Animal Communities
        •    Plants and Animals Together
        •    Forests – Trees and More Trees
        •    Grasslands – As Far As The Eye Can See
        •    Where Water is Scant
        •    Water Ecosystems

4.    Unit 4 – People on Earth (4 weeks)
    A.    People, Resources and Environment
        •    People and Environment
        •    People use Resources
        •    Where Resources Are

    B.    People and Culture
        •    What is Culture
        •    Material Culture
        •    Non-Material Culture

    C.    The Growth of Technology
        •    Early People
        •    The Development of Agriculture
        •    Western Civilization and Industrialization

    D.    Population Today
        •    Population Growth and Change
        •    Where People Live
        •    How do People Make Their Living

6.    Unit 5 – Different Ways of Living (5 weeks)
    A.    People of Forestlands
        •    The Forest as a Human Environment
        •    The Iban of Boreo
        •    Labrador’s Montagnais – Naskapi

    B.    People of Grasslands
        •    Grasslands as Human Environment
        •    The Masai of East Africa’s Savanna
        •    Harders of the Mongolian Stepps

    C.    People of Deserts and Tundra
        •    Deserts and Tundra as Human Environments
        •    The Bushman of Kalahari
        •    The Innuit of the Tundra

    D.    People of Lands Near Water
        •    Lands Near Water, as a Human Environment
        •    The Rice Growers of Thailand
        •    The Trobrianders of the South Pacific

Instruction and Grading:  Class participation, conduct and attitude, daily work, and open book test over each chapter.

90 – 100    A
80 – 89    B
70 – 79    C
60 – 69    D
59 -

Location:  Know the locations of major land masses and bodies of water.  Identify and locate important places and features of the world.  Discuss maps as a primary geographic tool.

Place:  Understand how humans create different and similar places.  Understand how different groups in society may view places differently.  Realize the effects of human actions and natural processes on places

Relationships within Places:  Understand how people use natural environments to obtain needed resources.  Recognize ways in which people modify different physical environments.

Movement:  Explain why human activities require movement.  Recognize that all cultures are interdependent.

Regions:  Describe how regions vary in scale from small to large.  Recognize how they form and change.


Physical Education
6th Grade

This course is designed to prepare students to have a physical and skilled well being.  Organized and structured fitness routines are offered so students can begin to make decisions about personal approaches to maintaining fitness levels.  After skills are broken down and taught with various drills, they are then applied in a game.  Social skills such as cooperation and good sportsmanship also are addressed.  Students need to expend their energy in a positive, active manner.  Students also need to learn to work together towards a common goal.

Current Text:  None

Main Topics:

1.    Volleyball
    A.    Fundamentals of the game
    B.    Serving from the front court
    C.    Use of beach ball or soft volleyball instead of a volleyball

2.    Presidential Physical Testing (Fall and Spring)
    A.    Two levels – Presidential and National
    B.    Test skills in the mile run, sit-ups, chin-ups, sit and reach and timed runts in blocks.

3.    Roller Skating

4.    Jump-Rope for Heart and Hoops for Heart

5.    Basketball
    A.    Fundamentals of shooting
    B.    Fundamentals of a proper follow through
    C.    Fundamentals of a proper jump shot
    D.    Fundamentals of a lay up
    E.    Shooting with in your range

6.    Hockey
    A.    Fundamentals of hockey
    B.    Importance of team work

7.    Skiing

8.    Soccer
    A.    Learning the rules
    B.    Learning team work
    C.    Dribbling

9.    Dancing
    A.    Different types

Instruction and Grading:  Students’ are given either a pass or fail grade.  Students are expected to come to class, run the proper laps, do the proper warm ups and then participate in the days activity without causing any problems.


Computer Applications Exploratory
6th Grade

This class is designed to familiarize students with various computer and digital technologies.  These technologies include the network, digital cameras, both still and video, web authoring software, JPG and JIF files, scanners, graphic conversion software, iMovie software, media converter, and digital editing software.

Current Text:  None

Main Topics:

1.    Familiarize students with the hierarchy and uses of a network.
    A.    Students will review how to log on and off of the network.
    B.    Students will review how to create folders on the server.
    C.    Students will review how to navigate from applications to various folders on the server.

2.    Students will become familiar with the use of a digital still camera.
    A.    Students will become familiar with general operation.
    B.    Students will become familiar with downloading to computer.

3.    Students will become familiar with how to use a scanner.

4.    Students will become familiar with how to use the Graphic Converter application.

5.    Students will become familiar with how to design and build a web page.
    A.    Students will learn the capabilities of Netscape Navigator and Netscape Communicator.
    B.    Students will learn how to use text tools.
    C.    Students will learn how to use format and alignment tools.
    D.    Students will learn how to create links.
    E.    Students will learn how to locate and download images from the Web.
    F.    Students will learn how to insert images.

6.    Students will become familiar with how to use a digital video camera.
    A.    Students will become familiar with general operation.
    B.    Students will become familiar with downloading to computer/iMovie.

7.    Students will become familiar with iMovie digital video editing software.

8.    Student will become familiar with Dazzle media converter.

Instruction and Grading:  Students’ will be taught about the above technologies through lectures, hands-on instruction, one-on-one consultations, and projects.  Students will develop projects using or incorporating the above technologies.  The projects developed will be the basis of the students’ grade.  All projects will be graded using rubrics.  Grades will be based on the Middle School grading scale.


Art
6th Grade

Main Topics:

This is an exploratory art course that is based on the use of the elements and principles of design in various media.  There is no textbook for this class.  Handouts, books, prints, examples and internet sources are used.  Each technique is demonstrated and examples are displayed along with a poster listing the directions and criteria for each assignment.

Class assignments will include some or all of the following.  Op Art, string prints, positive and negative cut paper designs, stained glass ornaments, mural painting, stamp design, blockheads, clay hands, and tessellations.

A checklist is completed for each assignment.  This lists the 5 most important criteria for that assignment.  Each criteria is worth 5 points for a total of 25 points per assignment.  The checklist is to be completed by the students and handed in with the assignment.  Names should be on both items.  The same checklist will be used by the teacher to grade the assignment.

Classroom participation is worth 2 points per day based on following the art room rules during each class period.  Working in class each day is an important part of the objectives of this course.  The rules are posted in the art room and are included in the list of expectations handed to each student at the beginning of the class.

Extra credit may be earned by handing in drawings and other artwork after the current assignment is finished.  Up to 3 points will be earned for each extra credit assignment to a maximum of 25 extra credit points for the course.

Instruction and Grading:  The final grade is determined by the percentage of points earned.


Band
6th Grade

Students in sixth grade band continue to develop those fundamental playing skills learned in the first year of playing an instrument.  They receive an individual lesson on their instrument once each cycle.  They rehearse as a band twice each cycle.

Students continue in the lesson book “Standard of Excellence” by Bruce Pearson.  When that book is completed, they move into the Student Instrumental Course Series.  Percussion students use the Performing Percussionist Series by James Coffin.  Band music is selected from a variety of styles and composers.  Music is selected that will build on learned skills as well as challenge students with new concepts.

Main Areas of Concentration
1.    Continue to develop tone and embouchure.
2.    Develop and expand range of notes played.
3.    Understand and play more complex rhythms with foot beat.
4.    Expand understanding and use of articulations – tongue, slur, legato, staccato, and accents.
5.    Develop concept of band sound and understanding of correct balance within the ensemble.
6.    Develop expressive playing-dynamics, phrasing, etc.
7.    Be able to play more challenging music within the ensemble as the year progresses.

Concerts:  Sixth grade band students are required to participate in three concerts during the school year.  These include the Fall Concert in November, the Bandorama in February, and the Variety Show in May.  Students also are encouraged to participate in the Middle School Solo and Ensemble. Contest.

Instruction and Grading:  Students’ are graded equally on progress in lessons and participation in band.  Students receive a letter grade for each lesson.  At the end of the quarter, lesson grades are averaged, and this is averaged with the band grade to determine the quarterly grade in band.



Music
6th Grade

Key:     I =     Introduce Concept
            D =     Develop Concept
            M =    Master and Maintain Concept
            NA =    Not Applicable until a later age level

Standard 1: Students, alone or with others, sing and/or play instruments using a varied repertoire of music. (National Standards 1 & 2)

A.    Sing and/or play music in two or more parts using literature of progressive difficulty:
    •    Sing and/or play an individual part with a contrasting part D
    •    Sing and play descants and countermelodies D
    •    Perform 3 and 4 part movement, speech, vocal and instrumental rounds D
    •    Perform beginning chordal harmony D
B.    Demonstrate knowledge of proper breathing techniques, tone production, and body and instrument position:
    •    Use both vocal and instrumental warm-ups D
    •    Sing with correct posture, correct breathing, clear diction D
    •    Play using correct posture, correct breathing, and mallet technique D
    •    Demonstrate care of the voice, including the changing voice D *
    •    Demonstrate care of the instrument D
C.    Sing and/or play with expression and technical accuracy:
    •    Select appropriate range – the lowest and highest notes employed by a song D
    •    Perform slur, staccato, legato D
D.     Sing and/or play an expanding repertoire of music representing diverse culture, genres, and styles:
    •    Include: languages of the world, cultures of the world, quality text, varied modes including major and minor, varied meter, varied styles, varied genres D
E.     Perform more complex rhythmic, melodic, and chordal patterns accurately on     rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic instruments:
    •    Melodic percussion instruments D
    •    Rhythmic percussion instrumentsD
    •    Guitars and keyboard instruments D
    •    12 bar blues, I-IV-V7 in appropriate keys, multi-chord accompaniments D
    •    Major/minor/pentatonic scales D
F.     Respond to conducting cues with increased awareness of musical elements such     as tempo, dynamics, and style:
    •    Watch the conductor for phrasing and expressive elements D
G.    Demonstrate improving ensemble skills:
    •    Maintain common beat, rhythm, and tempo D
    •    Maintain a balance of parts D
    •    Listen to own and others’ parts D
    •    Maintain assigned part (speak, play, sing, and move) D

Standard 2: Students read and notate music. (National Standard 5)

A.    Identify and read rhythmic patterns using whole, half, dotted half, dotted quarter, quarter, eighth, triplet eighth notes, sixteenth notes, and rests in varied meter signatures:
    •    Add dotted quarter note, dotted quarter-eighth note, dotted quarter-eighth rest, four sixteenth notes D
    •    Add pick-up notes D
B.    Identify, read, and notate melodic and rhythmic patterns using current music technology, traditional and, when appropriate, nontraditional music notation:
    •    Add fa and ti D
    •    Use diatonic scale in the keys of C, F, and G...D
    •    Read from a score of two or more staves I
C.    Identify the notes on a staff using the appropriate clef:
    •    Identify the roles of ledger lines D
    •    Add bass clef lines and spaces I
    •    Identify the grand staff I
D.    Identify sharp signs, flat signs, natural signs, and keys signatures, and their functions in music being performed:
    •    Identify accidentals D
    •    Distinguish between half and whole steps D
    •    Identify C, F, and G key signatures D
E.    Identify and apply symbols and traditional terms that refer to dynamics, tempo, meter, form and articulation:
    •    Add DaCapo al Fine (D.C. al Fine) and DalSegno (D.S.) D
    •    Add slur, staccato, legato D
    •    Add largo, andante, moderato, allegro, presto D

Standard 3: Students create music. (National Standards 3 & 4)

A.    Express musical ideas using a variety of sound sources:
    •    Appropriate identified sound sources M
B.    Create short compositions or arrangements using rhythmic, melodic, and/or harmonic patterns:
    •    Include frameworks such as, but not limited to: chromatic scale, pentatonic scale, diatonic scale, the keys of C, F, and G, 12 bar blues, I-IV-V7 chords in keys of C, F, and G, grade appropriate rhythms, and familiar forms D
C.    Improvise rhythmic, melodic, and/or harmonic patterns:
    •    Use grade appropriate rhythms, chord, scales and forms M

Standard 4: Students listen to, respond to, analyze, evaluate and describe music.(National Standards 6 & 7)

A.    Listen to and identify a variety of musical styles and genres:
    •    Such as, but not limited to recorded and/or live performances of jazz, 12 bar blues, folk, patriotic, classical (including opera, ballet, symphony) pop, country, world music, electronic and musical theater D
B.    Listen to, identify and describe simple musical forms:
    •    Theme and Variations D
    •    12 bar blues I
C.     Identify more advanced musical elements and expressive qualities using     appropriate musical vocabulary:
    •    Expand musical vocabulary into new and varied genres and styles NA
D.    Describe and respond to specific music events within a given work:
    •    Include bridges, instrumental interludes, and meter changes D
E.    Describe contrasts of timbre:
    •    Include instruments combined in different ways to form a variety of ensembles D
F.    Evaluate musical works and performances using expanding criteria:
    •    Include quality and effectiveness of performance M
    •    Include personal responses to performance M
    •    Use appropriate musical vocabulary M
G.    Demonstrate appropriate audience behavior:
    •    Include the following situations: in class, in performance, during assemblies, and as part of an audience D

Standard 5: Students understand music in relation to history and a variety of cultures. (National Standard 9)

A.    Participate in cultural activities:
    •    Participate in an appropriate manner D
B.    Elements of music:
    •    Identify how elements of music are used in examples from various cultures D
C.    Identify the role of music and musicians in various cultures, using a variety of music resources, such as, but not limited to: live music, recorded music, the Internet and CD-ROMs:
    •    Integrate Standard 5 with singing, playing, creating, and listening standard M
    •    Listen to and perform music from varied time periods D
    •    Compare and contrast the use of musical elements (such as, but not limited to: melody, rhythm, timbre, harmony, form, texture, vocal style, instrumental style) in music from different cultures I
    •    Listen to and perform music from varied time periods I

Standard 6: Students understand relationships between music, the other arts, and disciplines outside the arts. (National Standard 8)

A.    Identify the fine arts:
    •    Explore the disciplines D
B.    Identify similarities and differences in the meanings of common terms used in the various fine arts:
    •    Form M
    •    Style M
    •    Improvisation M
    •    Expression D
    •    Elements (i.e.: rhythm, harmony, texture, line, shape) D
    •    Theme D
    •    Warm-up D
    •    Movement D
C.    Fine arts reflect the culture:
    •    Demonstrate an understanding that the fine arts often reflect the culture in which they were created D

Grading:  Students will be graded on a daily behavior and participation point system, proficiency tests on guitar and keyboard, and written tests covering curriculum topics.  These total percentage points will be used to calculate grades based on the Middle School A,B,C,D,F grading scale.

*    Voice Checks:  Two or three times a school year students will meet individually with the instructor to chart their speaking voice pitch and lowest and highest pitch in their vocal range.  Students will learn about what stage of voice change they are presently in, the characteristics of that stage, and the upcoming changes to expect.


 

7th Grade

Language Arts
7th Grade

Current Tex:  English Composition and Grammar (John Warriner, Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1988 - First Course)

Main Topics:

1.    Grammar
    A.    Writing Complete Sentences
        •    Sentence fragments and run-on sentences

    B.    Writing Effective Sentences
        •    Sentence combining and revising

    C.    The Sentence
        •    Subject and predicate, kinds of sentences

    D.    The Parts of Speech
        •    Noun, pronoun, adjective

    E.    The Parts of Speech
        •    Verb, adverb, preposition, conjunction, interjection

    F.    Complements
        •    Direct and indirect objects, subject complements

    G.    The Phrase
        •    Independent and subordinate clauses

    H.    The Kinds of Sentence Structures
        •    Simple, compound, and complex sentences

2.    Vocabulary/Spelling
    A.    Vocabulary-Lit. (Perfection Learning Corp., 1991)

3.    Usage/Mechanics
    A.    Daily Oral Language (McDougal, Little & Co., 1989)

4.    Research Paper and Wax Museum
    A.    Students research a famous person and share their results in the form of a wax museum

Instruction and Grading:  Students will be graded on homework, quizzes and tests.  Late work will only be worth 60% of the students total points earned.


Literature
7th Grade

Current Text:  Discoveries in Literature (Scott Foresman, 1991)

Students are exposed to a wide variety of writing styles and types of literature, including science fiction, fantasy, nonfiction, fiction, poetry, drama, short stories, and novels.  They read about peers with different cultural backgrounds and lifestyles and learn to accept these differences.  Students learn “lessons in life” by relating to story characters’ problems and solutions; and they are able to examine their own values.

Main Topics:

Novels read:

    A Day No Pigs Would Die by Robert Newton Peck
    Summer of the Monkeys by Wilson Rawls
    Holes by Louis Sachar
    Jungle Dogs by Graham Salisbury
    Out of the Dust by Karen Hesse
    The Giver by Lois Lowry

1.    Poetry
    A.    Imagery, rhythm, rhyme schemes, similes, alliteration, personification, and tone
    B.    Haiku, cinquain, and diamonte
    C.    Poetry appreciation

2.    Short Stories
    A.    Plot, characterization, setting, point of view, theme, foreshadowing, and conflict
    B.    Comprehension

3.    Plays
    A.    Setting, characterization, dialogue, and mood
    B.    Comprehension

4.    Novels

Instruction and Grading:  Students’ will read aloud, in groups, and silently.  Assignments designed to be completed during the class period (usually).  Students will be graded on assignments, tests, and book reports.  Emphasis is on vocabulary and comprehension.  Projects are another type of assessment used in class.


Creative Writing
7th Grade

Main Topics:

1.    Free Writing
    •    Students write with the help of story starters

2.    Paragraph Writing
    •    Working with the writing process and developing well written paragraphs

3.    Who Did It?
    •    Creating a story involving mystery

4.    Create Your Own Country
    •    Using description to create a new place

5.    Newspaper
    •    Using sections of the paper to create unique news articles

6.    Interviews
    •    Interviewing teachers and students in the school while using the digital camera to create a human-interest story

7.    Dialogue
    •    Writing dialogue from a television program

8.    My Own Pick
    •    Choosing a story and finishing it (selection comes from earlier story starters)

9.    Create a Travel Brochure
    •    Using web quest

Instruction and Grading:  Students will be graded on daily journal writing, individual writing assignments and group projects using some type of technology.  The grade is based on total points achieved by the individual student.


Math
7th Grade

Main Topics:

1.    Communicating with Data
    A.    Making Sense of World Data
        •    Interpreting graphs
        •    Main bar graphs
        •    Line plots and stem-and-leaf diagrams
        •    Mean, median, mode, and range
        •    Line graphs
        •    Scatter plots and relationships
        •    Trend lines

    B.    Interpreting Graphs Using Technology

2.    Formulas
    A.    The Need and Use of Formulas
        •    Formulas and variables
        •    Order of operations
        •    Formulas and tables
        •    Inverse operations
        •    Translation works to expressions
        •    Solving addition and subtraction equations
        •    Problem solving with two-step equations
        •    Solving multiplication and division equations

    B.    Using Technology to Solve Formulas

3.    Estimating and Solving Equations
    A.    Understanding and Using Estimations
        •    Comparing and ordering decimals
        •    Estimating by rounding
        •    Sums and differences of decimals
        •    Products and quotients of decimals
        •    Powers of 10 and scientific notation
        •    Divisibility and prime factorization
        •    GCF and LCM
        •    Equivalent factions and lowest terms
        •    Comparing and ordering fractions
        •    Converting between fractions and decimals

    B.    Using Calculators to Solve Decimal Problems

4.    Sums and Differences of Fractions
    A.    Practical Uses of Fractions
        •    Estimation fractions and mixed numbers
        •    Adding and subtracting fractions
        •    Adding and subtracting mixed numbers
        •    Multiplying fractions
        •    Multiplying mixed numbers
        •    Dividing fractions and mixed numbers

    B.    Using Spreadsheets and Software

5.    Geometric Figures
    A.    Importance of Understanding Geometric Figures
        •    Angles
        •    Parallel and perpendicular lines
        •    Triangles and quadrilaterals
        •    Polygons
        •    Perimeter and area
        •    Squares and square roots
        •    The Pythagorean theorem
        •    Areas of triangles
        •    Areas of parallelograms and trapezoids
        •    Areas of irregular figures

    B.    Using Software to Solve Geometric Problems

6.    Rations and Rates
    A.    Practical Uses of Ratios and Rates
        •    Estimating ratios
        •    Estimating rate
        •    Equivalent ratios and rates
        •    Using tables to find ratios and rates

    B.    Using Technology to Find Ratios and Rates

7.    Scale Drawings of Maps and Scales
    A.    The Need for Scale Drawings
        •    Estimating actual and scale distances
        •    Calculating with scales
        •    Problem-solving using maps
        •    Creating scale drawings and scale models
        •    Comparing similar figures
        •    Choosing appropriate rates and units
        •    Converting units
        •    Converting rates
        •    Finding measures of similar figures
        •    Perimeters and areas of similar figures

    B.    Using Technology to Create Maps and Scales

8.    Percents
    A.    Understanding and Estimating Percents
        •    Understanding percents
        •    Linking fractions, percents, and decimals
        •    Percents greater than 100 or less than 1
        •    Finding the percent of a number mentally
        •    Using equations to solve percent problems
        •    Solving percent problems with proportions
        •    Problem-solving percent increases and decreases

    B.    Using Calculators to Find Percents

9.    Using Integers
    A.    Importance of Understanding Integers
        •    Using integers to represent quantities
        •    Comparing and ordering integers
        •    The coordinate plane
        •    Adding integers
        •    Subtracting integers
        •    Multiplying integers
        •    Dividing integers

    B.    Practical use of calculators to solve integer problems

10.    Tables, Equations and Graphs
    A.    Understanding Uses of Equations and Graphs
        •    Quantities, constants and variables
        •    Relating graphs to stories
        •    Tables and expressions
        •    Understanding and writing equations
        •    Solving equations using tables
        •    Equations and graphs
        •    Solving equations using graphs
        •    Relating equations and inequalities
        •    Integer addition and subtraction equations
        •    Integer multiplication and division equations
        •    Solving two-step equations
        •    Problem solving with integer equations

    B.    Using Programs to Solve and Make Graphs

11.    Polyhedrons
    A.    Understanding Polyhedrons
        •    Exploring polyhedrons
        •    Isometric and orthographic drawings
        •    Polyhedron nets and surface areas
        •    Volumes or prisms
        •    Circles and circle graphs
        •    Pi and circumference
        •    Area of a circle
        •    Surface area of cylinders
        •    Volumes of cylinders
        •    Translations
        •    Reflections and line symmetry
        •    Rotations and rotational symmetry

    B.    Practical Uses of Transformations

12.    Counting
    A.    Understanding the Different Methods of Counting
        •    Counting methods
        •    Arrangements
        •    Choosing a group
        •    Odds and Fairness
        •    Probability
        •    Experimental probability
        •    Independent and dependent events

    B.    Probability Testing

Instruction and Grading:  Students will be graded on homework, quizzes and various forms of testing.  Students are expected to attain at least 70% of the total points to pass.


Transition Math
7th Grade

This course is designed to prepare students for high school math.  The content includes preparation for algebra and geometry.

Current Text:  Transition Mathematics (Prentice Hall, 1998)

Main Topics:

1.    Decimal Notation
    A.    Decimals for Whole Numbers
    B.    Estimating
    C.    Knowing Your Calculator
    D.    Decimals for Simple Fractions
    E.    Decimals for Mixed Numbers
    F.    Negative Numbers
    G.    Comparing Numbers
    H.    Equal Fractions

2.    Large and Small Numbers
    A.    Multiplying by 10, 100, 1000, . . . .
    B.    Powers
    C.    Scientific Notation
    D.    Percent of a Quantity
    E.    From Decimals to Fractions and Percents
    F.    Circle Graphs

3.    Measurement
    A.    Measuring Length
    B.    Converting Lengths
    C.    Weight and Capacity
    D.    Metric System of Measurement
    E.    Converting
    F.    Measuring Angles
    G.    Measuring Area
    H.    Measuring Volume

4.    Uses of Variables
    A.    Order of Operations
    B.    Describing Patterns with Variables
    C.    Translating Words to Algebraic Expressions
    D.    Evaluating Expressions

5.    Patterns Leading to Addition
    A.    Models for Addition
    B.    Zero and Opposites
    C.    Rules for Adding Positive and Negative Numbers
    D.    Combining Turns
    E.    Adding Positive and Negative Fractions
    F.    Adding Probabilities
    G.    The Commutative and Associative Properties
    H.    Solving x + a = b
    I.    Polygons
    J.    Adding Lengths

6.    Problem Solving Strategies
    A.    Being a Good Problem Solver
    B.    Using a Spreadsheet

7.    Patterns Leading to Subtraction
    A.    Slide Model for Subtraction
    B.    Solving x – a = b
    C.    Solving a – x = b
    D.    Angles and Lines
    E.    Angels and Parallel Lines
    F.    Special Quadrilaterals
    G.    The Triangle-Sum Property

8.    Displays
    A.    Graphs and Other Displays
    B.    Bar Graphs
    C.    Coordinate Graphs
    D.    Graphing Lines
    E.    Translations
    F.    Reflections
    G.    Reflection Symmetry
    H.    Tessellations

9.    Patterns Leading to Multiplication
    A.    Area Model for Multiplication
    B.    Volumes of Rectangular Solids
    C.    Multiplication of Fractions
    D.    Multiplying Probabilities
    E.    The Rate Factor Model for Multiplication
    F.    Multiplication with Negative Numbers and Zero
    G.    Size Changes
    H.    Picturing Multiplication with Negative Numbers

Instruction and Grading:  Students’ will be graded on homework, quizzes, and tests.  Students are expected to attain at least 70% of the total possible points to pass transition math.


Life Science
7th Grade

This course is the study of life forms through simple classification, cell organization, reproduction, and ecology.  Students will learn the scientific method of problem solving, the metric system of measurement, and lab procedures.  Students will learn to recognize the diversity of life.

Current text:  Science (Glencoe/ McGraw-Hill, 2003)

Main topics:

1. The Nature of Science
     A. Introduction
     B. Measurement

2. The Environment
     A. Ecology- outdoor Ed. at Eagle Bluff
     B. Interactions of Life
     C. The Non-living Environment

3.  Cells
     A. Cell Processes
     B. Plant Processes
     C. Respiration and Excretion
     D. Animal Behavior

4.  Reproduction and Heredity
     A. Cell Reproduction
     B. Plant Reproduction
     C. Regulation and Reproduction
     D. Heredity

Instruction and Grading:  Grades for this class will be based on a total point system of worksheets, lab procedures and reports, quizzes, and tests.  Students must attain at least 60% to pass this course.


Civics
7th Grade

This American Civics program is designed to meet basic goals of civic education.  It provides students with a thorough understanding of our nations system of government.  The class works to instill in students the qualities of good citizenship, as well as encourages them to be active participants in a democratic society.

Current Text:  American Civics (Holt, Rinehart and Winston)

Main Topics:

Unit 1:  A Tradition of Democracy
    A.    We the People
    B.    Foundations of Government
    C.    The U.S. Constitution
    D.    Rights and Responsibilities

Unit 2:  The Federal Government
    A.    The Legislative Branch
    B.    The Executive Branch
    C.    The Judicial Branch

Unit 3:  State and Local Government
    A.    State Government
    B.    Local Government

Unit 4:  The Citizen in Government
    A.    Electing Leaders
    B.    The Political System
    C.    Paying for Government

Unit 5:  The Citizen in Society
    A.    Citizenship and the Family
    B.    Citizenship in School
    C.    Citizenship in the Community
    D.    Citizenship and the Law

Unit 6:  The American Economy
    A.    The Economic System
    B.    Goods and Services
    C.    Managing Money
    D.    Economic Challenges
    E.    Career Choices

Unit 7:  The United States and the World
    A.    Foreign Policy
    B.    Charting a Course

Unit 8:  Meeting Future Challenges
    A.    Improving Life for All Americans
    B.    The Global Environment

Instruction and Grading:  Grades for Civics class are homework, worksheet, cooperative learning exercises, and tests.  Students need to have a 60% grade to pass.


Careers Exploratory
7th Grade

Main Topics:

1.    Introduction to Careers (August)
    A.    Class rules and how they apply to preparing for the workplace.
    B.    Emphasis on our Success4 Character words: Respect, Responsibility, Trustworthiness and Cooperation.

2.    Understanding testing and how it applies to school and the workplace. Student is prepared for ITBS testing in the fall and using later testing instruments used in careers class (September).
    A.    What is a testing tool and why they are important.
    B.    Types of testing tools (interviews, observation, questionnaire, checklists, tests and standardized tests) and what they are and what they are used for.
    C.    Iowa Test of Basic Skills.  What they are, what they are important for, and how to prepare for them.
    D.    How to prepare yourself for standardized testing.  Coping/study techniques that help a student take a good test.

3.    The Real Game (October to January).  Canadian developed career exploration simulation that helps students understand what is involved with adult career decisions.
    A.    Introduction to the Simulation
        •    Understanding the three main terms (job occupation, career)
        •    Introducing the five main concepts:
            ?    Change is constant in life
            ?    Learning is ongoing throughout life
            ?    Focus on the journey – life’s up and downs
            ?    Follow your heart – understand one’s dreams
            ?    Access your allies – develop a network of help for the future
        •    Pretest is given to test understanding of how the world of work is
    B.    Exploring an Occupation
        •    Each student receives an occupation.
        •    Each student does activities to explore what is involved.
        •    The occupation is used for future activities.

    C.    Learning about Budgeting
        •    Students develop a dream list of things they would like to own.
        •    Students learn key budgeting concepts/terms (gross-net income, expenses, payroll deduction, mortgage, balancing expenses with income).
        •    The mathematics of percent is recalled.
        •    Students balance their own budget.

    D.    Leisure Time
        •    The concept of leisure time and relaxation is discussed.
        •    Students discuss the need to balance work with leisure activities for relaxation.
        •    Students develop a time inventory, mapping out time for work and play.
        •    Students will develop a graph of time spent during the week.

    E.    Vacation Time
        •    Students study the important of taking a vacation.
        •    The concept that vacations are based on a person’s disposable income.
        •    Students will in groups plan a vacation based on the income the group has.
        •    Students will do an inventory of costs for the vacation.

    F.    Gender in Work
        •    Students will define gender, equity, sex-role stereotyping, and non-traditional work role.
        •    Small groups discussion on reasons for equality in the workplace.
        •    Students will take inventories which identify sex-role stereotyping as well as look at statistics that show the present state of men vs. women in the work place.
        •    Students will make a judgment if the current occupation they have is suited for them.

    G.    Crisis Management
        •    Students will discuss the loss of a job (pink slip), what causes it, and what can be done to survive it.
        •    Students will define transferable skills and determine how it helps survive job loss.
        •    Networking, retraining, relocating, self-employment, and entrepreneurial life are discussed as options to consider in job loss.

    H.    Summary of Future Expectations
        •    Circle of life exercise which has students summarize their future expectations.

Note:  If we can’t finish by the 4th quarter, I usually stop to do the last activity (skipping parts).

4.    Exploring Post Secondary Education Opportunities (February – if time permits)
    A.    Types of post-secondary options (work, vocational, apprentice, 2-year college, 4-year and beyond.
    B.    Types of degrees and the occupations they prepare a student for.
    C.    Costs of post-secondary education and financial aid options.

5.    Portfolio Development for High School (March/April)
    A.    Explanation of a portfolio and what it is used for.
    B.    Career Exploration:
        •    Likes/dislikes and how they shape career selection
        •    Goal setting/future paper
        •    Learning styles inventory and how it affects career selection (students will take this inventory.
        •    Hollands personalities of work: how personality affects career selection (students will take the Holland Inventory which suggests occupations that fit a students personality).
        •    Choices or Kuder inventory: how likes and dislikes affect career choices (students will take an inventory if it is available which matches occupations that fit the likes and dislikes of the individual).
        •    If available, student will take an aptitude test which discusses skills a student may have for certain occupations.
        •    Graphing ITBS scores from the fall and reviewing how they work.
        •    If time permits, a career exploration paper summarizing an occupation the individual student may be interested in.

6.    Sky Movie (October)
        •    The five concepts of the Real Game are discussed as it is shown in the movie.
        •    Students identify the steps that the young man took in selecting his career as a rocket scientist.
        •    Students identify how change influenced the young man’s decision.
        •    Students identify how set backs can be dealt with.
        •    Students identify how goal setting is important in development of one’s career.

Instruction and Grading:  Students will be graded on in-class work, quizzes, cooperative learning, effort and tests.  In-class work and quizzes/tests account for 80% of the grade.  Extra credit is built into the in-class work.  Students are expected to attain at least 60% of total possible points to pass.


Physical Education
7th Grade

This course is designed to prepare students to have a physical and skilled, well being.  Organized and structures fitness routines are offered so that students can begin to make decisions about personal approaches to maintaining fitness levels.  After skills are broken down and taught with various drills, they are then applied in a game.  Social skills such as cooperation and good sportsmanship also are addressed.  Students need to expend their energy in a positive, active manner.  Students also need to learn to work together towards a common goal.

Main Topics:

1.    Volleyball
    A.    Fundamentals of the game
    B.    Proper serves
    C.    Proper set-ups and spikes

2.    Presidential Physical Testing (Fall and Spring)
    A.    Two levels – Presidential and National
    B.    Test skills in the mile run, sit-ups, chin-ups, sit and reach and timed runs in blocks.

3.    Roller Skating

4.    Jump-Rope for Heart and Hoops for Heart

5.    Basketball
    A.    Fundamentals of shooting
    B.    Fundamentals of a proper follow through
    C.    Fundamentals of a proper jump shot

6.    Hockey
    A.    Fundamentals of hockey
    B.    Importance of teamwork

7.    Skiing

8.    Soccer
    A.    Learning the rules
    B.    Learning teamwork

9.    Dancing
    A.    Different types

Instruction and Grading:  Students’ are given either a pass or fail grade.  Students are expected to come to class dressed, ready for the day’s activities.  If they come to class dressed, have a good attitude, do what they are supposed to without causing any trouble, they will pass.


Life Skills
7th Grade

Main Topics:

This course is designed to be an introduction to basic cooking and sewing.  The course is 9 weeks and is one of 4 exploratory classes that students experience in the 7th grade.

Current Text:  The World of Food (Glencoe Division McMillan/McGraw Hill, 1992 – Third Edition)

1.    Cooking Unit
    A.    Nutrition
    B.    The Food Pyramid
    C.    Staying healthy with food choices
    D.    Basic cooking methods
    E.    Learning equipment
    F.    Measurement
    G.    Reading Recipes
    H.    Cooking labs

2.    Sewing Unit
    A.    Parts of the sewing machine
    B.    Using a pattern
    C.    Cutting and tracing
    D.    Sewing vocabulary and technique
    E.    Sewing of pillow project

Instruction and Grading:  Students’ grades for this class will be determined by daily participation and behavior, in class assignments, thoroughness and neatness of work, test scores, lab work (ability to apply learned skills, cooperation with other class members and teacher, and willingness to assume responsibility and clean-up).  Grades are based on a total point system and students must attain at least 60% to pass this course.


Drama
7th Grade

This course is designed to prepare students to acquire theatre and stage skills as well as oral communication skills.  The course is taught throughout the school year for the duration of one quarter or one hex.

Main Topics:

1.    Play Talks
    A.    Students choose a one-act play out of Plays magazine
    B.    Students read and interpret the play
    C.    Students make an outline on cards according to the format instructed
        •    Introduction
        •    Character Analysis
        •    Plot Summary
        •    Closing
    D.    Students make a colorful drawing of one scene within their plot
    E.    Students give an oral presentation of their play and drawing using their outline on cards

2.    One Act Performance for the Elementary and Other 7th Graders
    A.    Students read two one act plays chose by the teacher
    B.    Students list their top three choices for a part they would like to portray
    C.    After the plays are cast, students are responsible for the following:
        •    Cooperation
        •    Memorization and vocal quality
        •    Characterization
        •    Costume(s)

Instruction and Grading:  Students’ are graded on their play talk presentation, cards, and drawing as well as their performance level of cooperation, memorization and vocal quality, characterization and costume.  Students are expected to attain at least 90% and above for an A, 80% and above for a B, 70% and above for a C, and at least 60% of the total possible points to pass 7th grade drama.


Art
7th Grade

This is an exploratory art course that is based on the use of the elements and principles of design in various media.  There is no textbook for this class.  Handouts, books, prints, examples and internet sources are used.  Each technique is demonstrated and examples are displayed along with a poster listing the directions and criteria for each assignment.

Class assignments will include some or all of the following.  Mosaics, silkscreen printing, paper mache, contour drawing, watercolor painting, circlemaker designs, calligraphy and clay.

A checklist is completed for each assignment.  This lists the 5 most important criteria for that assignment.  Each criteria is worth 5 points for a total of 25 points per assignment.  The checklist is to be completed by the student and handed in with the assignment.  Names should be on both items.  The same checklist will be used by the teacher to grade the assignment.

Classroom participation is worth 2 points per day based on following the art room rules during each class period.  Working in class each day is an important part of the objectives of this course.  The rules are posted in the art room and are included in the list of expectations handed to each student at the beginning of the class.

Extra credit may be earned by handing in drawings and other artwork after the current assignment is finished.  Up to 3 points will be earned for each extra credit assignment to a maximum of 25 extra credit points for the course.

Instruction and Grading:  The final grade is determined by the percentage of points earned.


Instrumental Music
7th and 8th Grade

Current Text:  Students will continue in their Standard of Excellence or move onto the Belwin series.

This course is designed to expand upon what has been learned in 5th and 6th Grade Band and transition them to High School Band.  Students will start playing music with different parts, music with time signatures other than 4/4, and different types of music.  Instrumental Music is a performance-based class; meaning, students will learn about music and how to play it through performance preparation.

Students will also be expected to have a regularly scheduled private lesson.  They will receive homework (practice) that will be due at their next lesson time.  Grades will be based on lesson performance, homework, and class time performance.

Main Topics:

1.    Marching Band
    A.    Students will learn the foundations of marching
    B.    Students will get hands on experience from doing parades

2.    Fall Concert
    A.    Students will be introduced to new concepts
    B    Student will start learning several different scales/warm-up exercises

3.    Solo/Ensemble Contest
    A.    Students will prepare a solo and/or small ensemble for contest
    B.    Students will gain an understanding of small group playing, or how to play with a piano accompaniment

4.    Variety Show
    A.    Students will play music that has a wider appeal to the general audience
    B.    Students will continue to expand on knowledge learned previously
    C.    Students will be introduced to music played at the High School level



Middle School Chorus
7th and 8th Grade

    Middle School Chorus is an elective for 7th and 8th grade students.  It is a performance based class with four required performances throughout the school year:
1.    Fall Concert
2.    Bulldog Cabaret
3.    Variety Show
4.    UIC Middle School Vocal Festival
Each spring registration is held for the upcoming school year.  While singers may join Chorus at anytime, they may only drop Chorus at the semester with permission from a parent.

    Rehearsals are every-other-day based on the following rotation:
•    Mixed Chorus
•    Women’s Chorus  (Men report to Study Hall)
•    Men’s Chorus  (Women report to Study Hall)
As every performance time approaches the rotation stops and Mixed Chorus rehearses each time.  (Women’s Chorus and Men’s Chorus are for rehearsing voicings to be put together during Mixed Chorus.)

    Middle School Chorus emphasizes:

1.   Choral Performance -
•    Sing with a healthy, appropriate vocal tone
•    Sing with a tone quality appropriate to one’s voice
•    Sing with understanding through the period of voice change*
•    Read and sing music written in unison, two, or three parts
•    Produce vowels using correct mouth shapes
•    Perform with correct singer’s posture and breath control
•    Perform expressively with accurate pitch, phrasing, dynamics, and interpretation
•    Sing appropriately with other students as part of a chorus
•    Follow and correctly interpret conducting gestures
•    Singers will memorize songs used for performances
•    Choreography may be added
•    Demonstrate enjoyment and a sense of accomplishment from participating in a performing group
•    Recognize the value of individual practice
•    Demonstrate continuing enjoyment and sense of accomplishment in performing music
•    Value reading music

2.    Music Theory -
•    Identify and read rhythmic patterns using notes, rests and meter signatures learned in earlier years
•    Learn to read new rhythmic patterns not learned in earlier years
•    Identify and read melodic intervals learned in earlier years
•    Learn to read new melodic intervals not learned in earlier years
•    Identify symbols and traditional terms that refer to dynamics, tempo, meter, form, and articulation

3.    Performance Etiquette -
•    Demonstrate appropriate performance behavior
•    Demonstrate appropriate audience behavior when not performing

4.    Performance Evaluation -
•    Singers will evaluate music quality and performance behavior after watching performance video
•    Singers will evaluate performances using appropriate musical vocabulary
•    Singers will include personal responses to performances

* 5.    Voice Checks –
•    Two or three times a school year singers will meet individually with the instructor to continue charting their speaking voice pitch and lowest and highest pitch in their vocal range as was started in 6th grade.
•    Students will continue to learn about what stage of voice change they are presently in, the characteristics of that stage, and the upcoming changes to expect.

6.    Grading -
•    Students will be graded on a daily behavior and participation point system, and written quarterly quizzes covering music theory, singer’s posture, vowel formations, and any terms or information presented in the songs from the present performance concert repertoire.  These total percentage points will be used to calculate grades based on the Middle School A,B,C,D,F grading scale.


General Music
7th and 8th Grade

7th and 8th Grade General Music is a required class. Each section meets once every 4 days for one class period. It is a non-performance class with the goal of continuing student exposure to music theory, history, and appreciation. During their two years in general music, 7th and 8th graders should accomplish the following goals:

1.    Literacy Development: The student understands and uses the written language of music.

2.    Listening/Critical Reasoning Development: The students listens to music with objectivity and meaning.

3.    Creativity Development: The student manipulates the elements of music.

4.    Values Development: The student develops a respect and tolerance for music as a worthy and essential component of life for all humans.

5.    Cultural Awareness Development: The student explores the place of music in human life today and in the past within a variety of cultures.

6.    Music Theory/Music History: The student experiences in-depth study of both the World music theory system and basic World history.

7.    Performance Development: In the course of history, theory or composition study, the student has the opportunity to perform in the classroom setting as part of a group or, optionally, alone.

Grading: Grades are based primarily on classroom participation and appropriate behavior with  the addition of written work and performance minimums for some units.


8th Grade

Language Arts
8th Grade

This course requires students to produce a variety of writing through integrated units, group, and individual projects.

Main Topics:

1.    Vocabulary
    A.    Vocabu – Lit Workbook (Perfection Learning Co.)
    B.    Quizzes
        •    Spelling
        •    Definition

2.    Parts of Speech
    A.    Nouns, Verbs, Adverbs, Adjectives, Prepositions
    B.    70% Accuracy on Tests Required to Pass

3.    Research Project
    A.    Select Topic
    B.    Research
    C.    Outline
    D.    Two-page Written Paper Required

4.    Native American Integrated Group Project
    A.    Research
    B.    Outline
    C.    Build Dwelling
    D.    Speech

5.    Nepal Comparison Paper
    A.    Learn about the Country and People
    B.    Write Paper Comparing out Lives to Theirs
    C.    Sponsor Nepali Street Children for Education

6.    Future
    A.    Ten Year Class Reunion Paper (what student will tell about his/her life)
    B.    Resume Writing

7.    Tolerance
    A.    Civil Rights Group Project
        •    Research project
        •    Create a presentation to teach class
    B.    Holocaust Readings

8.    Media
    A.    Groups Write Script for Existing Television Show
    B.    Groups form Advertising Agency and Create Magazine Ad Campaign
    C.    Groups Write, Produce, and Direct iMovie Commercials
    D.    Individuals Create own Magazines through a Simulation Game – Deadline

Instruction and Grading:  Grades are based on total points.  Approximately 50% for projects and papers, 25% for quizzes, and 25% class work.


Oral Communication and Literature
8th Grade

This course is designed to prepare students to acquire oral communication skills as well as reading skills.  This course focuses on skills for public speaking, literary skills, and the year-long theme of tolerating differences in others.  The course is taught throughout the school year.

Main Topics:

1.    Introduction to Public Speaking
    A.    Introduction speech
    B.    Speeches used to persuade
    C.    Research speech concentrating on researching skills, outlining skills, technology skills, and oral communication skills.

2.    Individualized Reading
    A.    Choosing books of interest (from the following categories, one each quarter):
        •    Biography, autobiography or nonfiction
        •    Award winner or classic
        •    Science fiction or fantasy
    B.    Giving oral book reports on the above books using communication and outlining skills.

3.    The Light in the Forest by Conrad Richter
    A.    Various reading assignments using a variety of ways to read.
    B.    Worksheets and supplementary readings enhancing the historical aspect of the novel.
    C.    Worksheets over theme, character, and main idea.
    D.    Quizzes checking reading comprehension.
    E.    End of the unit assessment.
    F.    Hands-on integrated Native American unit integrating science, language arts, history and literature.

4.    The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton
    A.    Various reading assignments using a variety of ways to read.
    B.    Worksheets concentrating on theme, characters, main idea, and conflict.
    C.    Quizzes checking reading comprehension.
    D.    End of the unit assessment.

5.    Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry by Mildred Taylor
    A.    Various reading assignments using a variety of ways to read.
    B.    Worksheets concentrating on theme, characters, and main idea.
    C.    Quizzes checking reading comprehension.
    D.    End of the unit assessment.
    E.    Integrated Civil Rights unit with language arts concentrating on technology skills, outlining skills, researching skills, and oral communication skills.

6.    The Diary of Anne Frank and The Devil’s Arithmetic by Jane Yolen
    A.    Various reading assignments using a variety of ways to read.
    B.    Worksheets and supplementary readings enhancing the historical aspect of the novel and the Holocaust.
    C.    Worksheets over theme, characters, and main idea.
    D.    Quizzes checking reading comprehension.
    E.    End of the unit assessment.

7.    Across Five Aprils by Irene Hunt
    A.    Integrated with history class concentrating on the historical aspect of the novel and the Civil War.
    B.    Supplementary readings over a variety of battles and conditions of the Civil War with comprehension questions.
    C.    Various reading assignments using a variety of ways to read.
    D.    Worksheets over theme, characters, and main idea.
    E.    Quizzes checking reading comprehension.
    F.    Power point presentations over a battle (students may do this with a partner or alone, their choice).
    G.    Each student does a power point presentation on a Civil War personality.
    H.    End of the unit timeline.

Instruction and Grading:  Students’ will be graded on homework, quizzes, assessments, and presentation.  Students are expected to attain at least 90% and above for an A, 80% and above for a B, 70% and above for a C, and at least 60% of the total possible points to pass.


Algebra
8th Grade

This course is designed to prepare students for high school math.  The content includes preparation for geometry.

Current Text:  Algebra (Prentice Hall, 2002)

Main Topics:

1.    Uses of Variables
    A.    Variables in Sentences
    B.    Sets and Domains
    C.    Operations with Sets
    D.    Variables in Expressions
    E.    Variables in Formulas
    F.    Square Foots and Variables
    G.    Variables and Patterns
    H.    The Pythagorean Theorem

2.    Multiplication in Algebra
    A.    Areas, Arrays, and Volumes
    B.    Special Numbers in Multiplication
    C.    Multiplying Algebraic Fractions
    D.    Multiplying Rates
    E.    Products and Powers with Negative Numbers
    F.    Solving ax = b
    G.    Special Numbers in Equations
    H.    Solving ax < b
    I.    The Multiplication Counting Principle
    J.    Factorials and Permutations

3.    Addition in Algebra
    A.    Models and Properties of Addition
    B.    The Coordinate Plane
    C.    Two Dimensional Slides
    D.    Solving ax + b < c
    E.    The Distributive Property and Removing Parentheses
    F.    Writing Linear Expressions
    G.    Adding Algebraic Fractions
 

4.    Subtraction in Algebra
    A.    Subtraction of Real Numbers
    B.    Models for Subtraction
    C.    Solving Sentences Involving Subtraction
    D.    Spreadsheets
    E.    The Opposite of a Sum or Difference
    F.    Graphing x + y = k and x – y = k
    G.    Sums and Differences in Geometry
    H.    The Triangle Inequality
    I.    Graphing Linear Patterns

5.    Linear Sentences
    A.    Horizontal and Vertical Lines
    B.    Using Tables to Compare Linear Expressions
    C.    Solving ax + b = cx + d
    D.    Equivalent Formulas
    E.    Advanced Solving Techniques

6.    Division in Algebra
    A.    The Algebraic Definition of Division
    B.    Rates
    C.    Ratios
    D.    Relative Frequency and Probability
    E.    Solving Percent Problems Using Equations
    F.    Size Changes
    G.    Proportions
    H.    Similar Figures

7.    Slopes and Lines
    A.    Rates of Change
    B.    The Slope of a Line
    C.    Properties of Slope
    D.    Slope-Intercept Equations for Lines
    E.    Equations for Lines with a Given Point and Slope
    F.    Fitting a Line to Data
    G.    Graphing Linear Inequalities

8.    Exponents and Powers
    A.    Compound Interest
    B.    Exponential Growth
    C.    Exponential Decay
    D.    Products and Powers of Powers
    E.    Negative Exponents
    F.    Quotients of Power
    G.    Powers of Products and Quotients

9.    Quadratic Equations and Square Roots
    A.    Graphing y = ax?2
    B.    Quadratic Equations and Projectiles
    C.    The Quadratic Formula
    D.    Analyzing Solutions to Quadratic Equations
    E.    Square Roots and Products
    F.    Distances in the Plane

Instruction and Grading:  Students’ will be graded on homework, quizzes, and tests.  Students’ are expected to attain at least 70% of the total possible points to pass.



Transition Math (Pre-Algebra)
8th Grade

This course is designed to prepare students to acquire math skills and constitutes the core of the first year in a six-year mathematics curriculum devised by that component.  The course is taught throughout the school year.

Current Text:  Transition Mathematics: Integrated Mathematics (Scott Foresman, Addison-Wesley, 1998)

Main Topics:

1.    For Each Lesson
    A.    Students develop skills in reading and interpreting math language
    B.    Covering the reading questions checks for comprehension
    C.    Listening and interpreting examples checks for understanding
    D.    Worksheets practicing math skills
    E.    Two quizzes are given within each chapter to check for understanding and retention
    F.    A final assessment of skills is given at the end of each chapter

2.    Chapter 1 – Decimal Notation
    A.    Decimals for Whole Numbers
    B.    Decimals for Numbers between Whole Numbers
    C.    Estimating by Rounding Up or Rounding Down
    D.    Estimating by Rounding to the Nearest
    E.    Knowing your Calculator
    F.    Decimals for Simple Fractions
    G.    Decimals for Mixed Numbers
    H.    Negative Numbers
    I.    Comparing Numbers
    J.    Equal Fractions

3.    Chapter 2 – Large and Small Numbers
    A.    Multiplying by 10, 100,  . . .
    B.    Powers
    C.    Scientific Notation for Large Numbers
    D.    Multiplying by 1/10, 1/100, . . .
    E.    Percent of a Quantity
    F.    From Decimals to Fractions and Percents
    G.    Circle Graphs
    H.    More Powers of Ten
    I.    Scientific Notation for Small Numbers

4.    Chapter 3 – Measurement
    A.    Measuring Length
    B.    Converting Length
    C.    Weight and Capacity in the Customary System of Measurement
    D.    The Metric System of Measurement
    E.    Converting between Systems
    F.    Measuring Angles
    G.    Kinds of Angles
    H.    Measuring Area
    I.    Measuring Volume

5.    Chapter 4 – Uses of Variables
    A.    Order of Operations
    B.    Describing Patterns with Variables
    C.    Translating Words to Algebraic Expressions
    D.    Evaluating Algebraic Expressions
    E.    Parentheses
    F.    Grouping Symbols
    G.    Formulas
    H.    Probability
    I.    Open Sentences
    J.    Inequalities

6.    Chapter 5 – Patterns Leading to Addition
    A.    Models for Addition
    B.    Zero and Opposites
    C.    Rules for Adding Positive and Negative Numbers
    D.    Combining Turns
    E.    Adding Positive and Negative Fractions
    F.    Adding Probabilities
    G.    The Commutative and Associative Properties
    H.    Solving x + a = b
    I.    Polygons
    J.    Adding Lengths

7.    Chapter 6 – Problem Solving Strategies
    A.    Being a Good Problem Solver
    B.    Read Carefully
    C.    Draw a Picture
    D.    Trial and Error
    E.    Make a Table
    F.    Use a Spreadsheet
    G.    Special Cases and Simpler Numbers

8.    Chapter 7 – Patterns Leading to Subtraction
    A.    Two Models for Subtraction
    B.    The Slide Model for Subtraction
    C.    Solving x – a = b
    D.    Solving a – x = b
    E.    Counting and Probability with Overlap
    F.    Angles and Lines
    G.    Angles and Parallel Lines
    H.    Special Quadrilaterals
    I.    The Triangle-Sum Property

9.    Chapter 8 – Displays
    A.    Graphs and Other Displays
    B.    Bar Graphs
    C.    Coordinate Graphs
    D.    Translations (Slides)
    E.    Reflections
    F.    Reflection Symmetry
    G.    Tessellations

10.    Chapter 9 – Patterns Leading to Multiplication
    A.    The Area Model for Multiplication
    B.    Volumes of Rectangular Solids
    C.    Multiplication of Fractions
    D.    Multiplying Probabilities
    E.    The Rate Factor Model for Multiplication
    F.    Multiplication with Negative Numbers and Zero
    G.    Size Changes – Expansions
    H.    Size Changes – Contractions
    I.    Picturing Multiplication with Negative Numbers

Instruction and Grading:  Students’ will be graded on homework, quizzes, and assessments.  Students’ are expected to attain at least 85% and above for an A, 72% and above for a B, 60% and above for a C, and at least 50% of the total possible points to pass. 



General Math
8th Grade

This course is designed to help students understand the basic concepts in Math and prepare for High School Math.  We will be reviewing and strengthening our previously learned math skills and acquiring new skills in problem solving, graphing, and pre-algebra.  It is very important that student’s master basic math computation and we will focus on this great deal.

Current Text:  Middle School Math (Scott Foresman-Addison Wesley, Course 3, 1999)

Main Topics:

1.    Skills Review

2.    Data Analysis

3.    Integers

4.    The Language of Algebra (Variable, Expressions, and Equations)

5.    Ratio and Proportion

6.    Percent

7.    Rational and Irrational Numbers

8.    Geometry and Measurement

9.    Area and Volume

10.    Algebra (Functions and Relationships)

11.    Similarity, Congruence, and Transformation

12.    Counting and Probability

Instruction and Grading:  Students’ are graded on homework, quizzes, and tests.  Test and quizzes are designed to let student’s express what they have mastered during the lessons and therefore are weighted accordingly to grade assessment.



Science
8th Grade

This course is designed to expand students knowledge of the natural world through investigation, experimentation and modeling.  Students will explore a wide-range of topics in the three major fields of science, biology, earth and physical science.  Students will learn about various systems in science and the structures, cycles and processes that make them up.  These systems include parts of the physical world and the human organism.

Current Text:  Glencoe Science (Glencoe/McGraw Hill, Level Blue, 2003)

Other Resources:  The book is available on tape in the resource room to be read to students who need extra help.  Each student receives an expanded syllabus with details on classroom procedures.

Main Topics:

1.    The Nature of Science

2.    The Physical Setting
    A.    The Universe
    B.    The Earth
    C.    Processes that Shape the Earth
    D.    Energy Transformation
    E.    Forces of Nature (Weather and Climate)

3.    The Human Organism
    A.    Human Identity
    B.    Human Development
    C.    Basic Functions
    D.    Physical and Mental Health

4.    Historical Perspectives
    A.    Science through the Ages
    B.    Discovering Germs

5.    Habits of Mind
    A.    Values, Attitudes, and Evidence
    B.    Computation and Estimation
    C.    Measuring, Experimenting, Predicting
    D.    Communication Skills

Instruction and Grading:  Students’ will be graded on class participation, homework, quizzes and tests.  All will have equal value in consideration of the final grade.  Students’ will keep a science composition notebook for the entire year.



Environmental Science
8th Grade

Environmental Science is a guided exploratory for 8th grade students.  Each hex will have the opportunity to explore topics related to Environmental Science and current issues related to the environment.

While many of the topics and activities covered will be similar in nature during each hex, the depth at which we cover them and the direction we take in our explorations will be governed by class interest, the season and student participation.

It is expected that students come prepared with their assignments and willingness to participate in all class activities.

Current Text:  Glencoe Science (Glencoe-McGraw Hill, Level Blue, 2003)

Main Topics:

1.    Planet and Animal Interactions

2.    Biodiversity

3.    Resources

4.    Pollution

5.    Conservation

6.    Environmental Issues and Problems

7.    Interconnected Life

8.    Important Figures in Environmental Science

Instruction and Grading:  Students’ will be assessed on projects, labs, activities, and daily work.  There is a final essay included in the student’s grade.  This essay will incorporate all the information the students have learned in this class. 


Health
8th Grade

This course is designed to give students an introductory background to good health.  The course is a 7week course and is one of 5 Hex classes that are a part of the 8th grade middle school curriculum.

Current Text:  Teen Health (Glencoe/McGraw Hill, 1996 – Course 2)

Main Topics:

1.    Overall Health
    A.    Physical
    B.    Social
    C.    Mental or Emotional

2.    Staying Healthy
    A.    Skin, Hair, and Nails
    B.    Ears
    C.    Mouth and Teeth
    D.    Eyes
    E.    Posture

3.    Communicable and Non-Communicable Diseases
    A.    Your Bodies Immune System
    B.    Vaccines & Prevention
    C.    STDs

4.    Videos
    A.    Surviving High School (issues facing students about to enter high school)
    B.    Tobacco, Truth or Dare (tobacco use in teenagers – lifetime affects)
    C.    The Truth about Drugs & Alcohol (drug use in teenagers –lifetime affects
    D.    The Truth about Sex (STDs and making responsible decisions about sex)

Instruction and Grading:  Grades for this class are determined by: a) daily participation and behavior; b) in class assignments; c) thoroughness and neatness of work; and d) test scores.  Grades are based on a total point system and students must attain at least 60% to pass.


American History
8th Grade

This course is designed to give students an overview of American history from the first Americans to the end of the Civil War.  Learning about our history will help students learn what it means to be an American.

Current Text:  A History of US (Oxford University Press, 3rd Edition, 2003)
    The First Americans
    Making Thirteen Colonies
    From Colonies to Country
    The New Nation
    Liberty for All?
    War, Terrible War

Main Topics:

1.    The First Americans
    A.    America Before Europeans
    B.    How Native Americans adapted to their Environments
    C.    Milestones in the European Journey to the Americas
    D.    The Conquistadors
    E.    Early Explorers of North America
    F.    The French come to America
    G.    Early English Settlers

2.    Making Thirteen Colonies
    A.    The English come to Virginia
    B.    The Virginia Colony takes Root
    C.    Colonizing Massachusetts
    D.    Discontent among the New England Colonies
    E.    Founding the Middle Colonies
    F.    Founding the Southern Colonies
    G.    The Colonies Continue to Grow

3.    From Colonies to Country
    A.    The French and Indian War
    B.    Trying to Stay in Charge
    C.    Events that Provoked the Revolution
    D.    The Early Road to Independence
    E.    Fighting the War for Independence
    F.    Experimenting with Independence
    G.    Creating a New Nation

4.    The New Nation
    A.    Early Firsts in American Political History
    B.    Landmarks and Trials of the New Republic
    C.    The Expanding Frontier’s Impact on Native Americans
    D.    The War of 1812 and More
    E.    The Blossoming of American Know How
    F.    The Effects of the Expanding Old South
    G.    Views on Slavery from the North, South, and West

5.    Liberty for All
    A.    Expansions West of the Mississippi
    B.    Manifest Destiny
    C.    The Growth of American Communication, Transportation, and Commerce
    D.    Urbanization and Industrialization
    E.    Women’s Lives in the 1800’s
    F.    The Flowering of American Culture
    G.    The Growing Crisis over Slavery

6.    War, Terrible War
    A.    The Issues that Make up the “Horrible Nightmare” of Slavery
    B.    The Conflict over Slavery Intensifies
    C.    The South Secedes
    D.    A House Divided
    E.    An Overview of the Battles of the Civil War
    F.    The End of the Civil War and Lincoln’s Assassination

Instruction and Grading:  Instruction will include readings, lectures, research, videos, individual and group assignments, as well as student presentations.  Students will be graded on class work, homework, quizzes, tests, and projects.  Total points will be used to calculate grades.  Grades will be based on the Middle School grading scale.


World Cultures Exploratory
8th Grade

This class is designed to introduce students to a general overview of countries throughout the world.  Further, individual students will study two to three countries of their choosing in depth.  Students will also become familiar with internet research techniques, as well as ClarisImpact presentation software.

Main Topics:

1.    Students will select two to three countries from an assigned region.

2.    Students will research information about the following topics as it pertains to their countries.
    A.    Geography
    B.    People
    C.    Government
    D.    Economy
    E.    Communications
    F.    Transportation
    G.    Military
    H.    History
    I.    Culture
    J.    Other Interesting Facets

3.    Students will use internet search engines and techniques to gather information.
    A.    Google Search
        •    Image
        •    Text
    B.    Yahoo
    C.    Lycos

4.    Students will copy and paste information found on the internet to Claris works.

5.    Students will use ClarisImpact to construct a presentation about their countries.
    A.    Construct slides
    B.    Insert transitions
    C.    Import graphics
    D.    Use copy and past techniques to insert text into slides

6.    Students will present their countries to the rest of the class using ClarisImpact.

Instruction and Grading:  Students’ will be taught how to conduct research using the web and how to make a ClarisImpact presentation using lectures, hands-on instruction, and one-on-one consultations.  Students will learn about other cultures by conducting research, listening to and viewing student presentations, and participating in teacher directed activities.  Students will be graded on their final presentation using a 370-point rubric.  Grades are based on the Middle School grading scale.


Introductory Spanish
8th Grade

This course lasts 7 1/2 weeks and is designed to introduce students’ to the Spanish language.  Optimal learning is achieved through the use of games, songs, and hands on activities.  The class is taught in Spanish, with the teacher using many gestures in an effort to provide the student’s the opportunity to understand the language and realize that communication and comprehension is possible.

Units Studied:  Family members, rooms of a house, adjective and noun agreement, AR verb conjugation, and food.

Instruction and Grading:  In-class student participation, as well as out-of-class review are the key factors to a student’s success.  Grades are based on quizzes and homework.


 
Careers Exploratory
8th Grade

1.    4-year plan developed/block scheduling course selection for high school
        •    What a four year plan is and why it is important.
        •    What are credits and graduation requirements.
        •    High school course selection and how to select to fit one’s needs for post-secondary education and entering the work force.
        •    Filling out of a four year plan.
    (Advisors take over after class and help fill out a 4-year plan based on current courses available at MFL MarMac CSD.)

    Registration takes place at the Middle School second semester with personnel resources from High School and Middle School.

2.    Resume development (part of Language Arts class)
        •    Students study the writing tool a resume is.
        •    Students write a resume for their portfolios.

Instruction and Grading:  Students will be graded on in-class work, quizzes, cooperative learning, effort and tests.  In-class work and quizzes/tests account for 80% of the grade.  Extra credit is built into the in-class work.  Students are expected to attain at least 60% of total possible points to pass.



Physical Education
8th Grade

This course is designed to prepare students to have a physical and skilled well being.  Organized and structured fitness routines are offered so students can begin to make decisions about personal approaches to maintaining fitness levels.  After skills are broken down and taught with various drills, they are then applied in a game.  Social skills such as cooperation and good sportsmanship also are addressed.  Students need to expend their energy in a positive, active manner.  Students also need to learn to work together towards a common goal.

Current Text:  None

Main Topics:

1.    Volleyball
    A.    Fundamentals of the game
    B.    Proper serves
    C.    Proper set-ups and spikes

2.    Presidential Physical Testing (Fall and Spring)
    A.    Two levels – Presidential and National
    B.    Test skills in the mile run, sit-ups, chin-ups, sit and reach and timed runts in blocks.

3.    Roller Skating

4.    Jump-Rope for Heart and Hoops for Heart

5.    Basketball
    A.    Fundamentals of shooting
    B.    Fundamentals of a proper follow through
    C.    Fundamentals of a proper jump shot

6.    Hockey
    A.    Fundamentals of hockey
    B.    Importance of team work

7.    Skiing

8.    Soccer
    A.    Learning the rules
    B.    Learning team work

9.    Dancing
    A.    Different types

Instruction and Grading:  Students’ are given either a pass or fail grade.  Students are expected to come to class dressed and ready for the day’s activities. If they come to class dressed, have a good attitude, do what they are expected to do without causing any trouble, they will pass.



Art
8th Grade

This is an exploratory art course that is based on the use of the elements and principles of design in various media.  There is no textbook for this class.  Handouts, books, prints, examples and internet sources are used.  Each technique is demonstrated and examples are displayed along with a poster listing the directions and criteria for each assignment.

Class assignments will include some or all of the following.  Name banner, castle drawing, still life drawing, colored pencil shading, tempera painting, self portrait in pastels, posters with watercolors, picture autobiography and clay.

A checklist is completed for each assignment.  This lists the 5 most important criteria for that assignment.  Each criteria is worth 5 points for a total of 25 points per assignment.  The checklist is to be completed by the students and handed in with the assignment.  Names should be on both items.  The same checklist will be used by the teacher to grade the assignment.

Classroom participation is worth 2 points per day based on following the art room rules during each class period.  Working in class each day is an important part of the objectives of this course.  The rules are posted in the art room and are included in the list of expectations handed to each student at the beginning of the class.

Extra credit may be earned by handing in drawings and other artwork after the current assignment is finished.  Up to 3 points will be earned for each extra credit assignment to a maximum of 25 extra credit points for the course.

The final grade is determined by the percentage of points earned.


Instrumental Music
7th and 8th Grade

Current Text:  Students will continue in their Standard of Excellence or move onto the Belwin series.

This course is designed to expand upon what has been learned in 5th and 6th Grade Band and transition them to High School Band.  Students will start playing music with different parts, music with time signatures other than 4/4, and different types of music.  Instrumental Music is a performance-based class; meaning, students will learn about music and how to play it through performance preparation.

Students will also be expected to have a regularly scheduled private lesson.  They will receive homework (practice) that will be due at their next lesson time.  Grades will be based on lesson performance, homework, and class time performance.

Main Topics:

1.    Marching Band
    A.    Students will learn the foundations of marching
    B.    Students will get hands on experience from doing parades

2.    Fall Concert
    A.    Students will be introduced to new concepts
    B    Student will start learning several different scales/warm-up exercises

3.    Solo/Ensemble Contest
    A.    Students will prepare a solo and/or small ensemble for contest
    B.    Students will gain an understanding of small group playing, or how to play with a piano accompaniment

4.    Variety Show
    A.    Students will play music that has a wider appeal to the general audience
    B.    Students will continue to expand on knowledge learned previously
    C.    Students will be introduced to music played at the High School level


Middle School Chorus
7th and 8th Grade

    Middle School Chorus is an elective for 7th and 8th grade students.  It is a performance based class with four required performances throughout the school year:
1.    Fall Concert
2.    Bulldog Cabaret
3.    Variety Show
4.    UIC Middle School Vocal Festival
Each spring registration is held for the upcoming school year.  While singers may join Chorus at anytime, they may only drop Chorus at the semester with permission from a parent.

    Rehearsals are every-other-day based on the following rotation:
•    Mixed Chorus
•    Women’s Chorus  (Men report to Study Hall)
•    Men’s Chorus  (Women report to Study Hall)
As every performance time approaches the rotation stops and Mixed Chorus rehearses each time.  (Women’s Chorus and Men’s Chorus are for rehearsing voicings to be put together during Mixed Chorus.)

    Middle School Chorus emphasizes:

1.   Choral Performance -
•    Sing with a healthy, appropriate vocal tone
•    Sing with a tone quality appropriate to one’s voice
•    Sing with understanding through the period of voice change*
•    Read and sing music written in unison, two, or three parts
•    Produce vowels using correct mouth shapes
•    Perform with correct singer’s posture and breath control
•    Perform expressively with accurate pitch, phrasing, dynamics, and interpretation
•    Sing appropriately with other students as part of a chorus
•    Follow and correctly interpret conducting gestures
•    Singers will memorize songs used for performances
•    Choreography may be added
•    Demonstrate enjoyment and a sense of accomplishment from participating in a performing group
•    Recognize the value of individual practice
•    Demonstrate continuing enjoyment and sense of accomplishment in performing music
•    Value reading music

2.    Music Theory -
•    Identify and read rhythmic patterns using notes, rests and meter signatures learned in earlier years
•    Learn to read new rhythmic patterns not learned in earlier years
•    Identify and read melodic intervals learned in earlier years
•    Learn to read new melodic intervals not learned in earlier years
•    Identify symbols and traditional terms that refer to dynamics, tempo, meter, form, and articulation

3.    Performance Etiquette -
•    Demonstrate appropriate performance behavior
•    Demonstrate appropriate audience behavior when not performing

4.    Performance Evaluation -
•    Singers will evaluate music quality and performance behavior after watching performance video
•    Singers will evaluate performances using appropriate musical vocabulary
•    Singers will include personal responses to performances

* 5.    Voice Checks –
•    Two or three times a school year singers will meet individually with the instructor to continue charting their speaking voice pitch and lowest and highest pitch in their vocal range as was started in 6th grade.
•    Students will continue to learn about what stage of voice change they are presently in, the characteristics of that stage, and the upcoming changes to expect.

6.    Grading -
•    Students will be graded on a daily behavior and participation point system, and written quarterly quizzes covering music theory, singer’s posture, vowel formations, and any terms or information presented in the songs from the present performance concert repertoire.  These total percentage points will be used to calculate grades based on the Middle School A,B,C,D,F grading scale.
 


General Music
7th and 8th Grade

7th and 8th Grade General Music is a required class. Each section meets once every 4 days for one class period. It is a non-performance class with the goal of continuing student exposure to music theory, history, and appreciation. During their two years in general music, 7th and 8th graders should accomplish the following goals:

1.    Literacy Development: The student understands and uses the written language of music.

2.    Listening/Critical Reasoning Development: The students listens to music with objectivity and meaning.

3.    Creativity Development: The student manipulates the elements of music.

4.    Values Development: The student develops a respect and tolerance for music as a worthy and essential component of life for all humans.

5.    Cultural Awareness Development: The student explores the place of music in human life today and in the past within a variety of cultures.

6.    Music Theory/Music History: The student experiences in-depth study of both the World music theory system and basic World history.

7.    Performance Development: In the course of history, theory or composition study, the student has the opportunity to perform in the classroom setting as part of a group or, optionally, alone.

Grading: Grades are based primarily on classroom participation and appropriate behavior with  the addition of written work and performance minimums for some units.


Resource Language I
6th – 8th Grade

Current Text:  Spelling Workout (Modern Curriculum Press, Levels A-H)

Main Topics:

1.    Skills
    A.    Consonants
    B.    Short vowels
    C.    Long vowels
    D.    Consonant blends/clusters
    E.    Y as a vowel
    F.    Consonant digraphs (th, ch, sh, wh, ck)
    G.    Vowel digraphs
    H.    R – controlled vowels
    I.    Dipthongs
    J.    Silent consonants
    K.    Hard and soft c and g
    L.    Plurals
    M.    Prefixes
    N.    Suffixes/endings
    O.    Contractions
    P.    Possessives
    Q.    Compound words
    R.    Synonyms/antonyms
    S.    Homonyms
    T.    Spellings of /f/ (f, ff. ph, gh)
    U.    Syllables
    V.    Commonly misspelled words
    W.    Abbreviations
    X.    Latin roots
    Y.    Words with French or Spanish derivation
    Z.    Words with Latin/French/Greek origin
    AA.    List words related to specific curriculum areas
    BB.    Vocabulary development
    CC.    Dictionary
    DD.    Writing
    EE.    Proofreading
    FF.    Reading selections
    GG.    Bonus words
    HH.    Review tests in standardized format

2.    Spelling Through Writing
    A.    Poetry
    B.    Narrative writings
    C.    Descriptive writings
    D.    Expository writings
    E.    Persuasive writings
    F.    Notes/letters
    G.    Riddles/jokes
    H.    Recipes/menus
    I.    News stories
    J.    Conversations/dialogues
    K.    Stories
    L.    Interviews/surveys
    M.    Logs/journals
    N.    Ads/brochures
    O.    Reports
    P.    Literary/devices
    Q.    Scripts
    R.    Speeches
    S.    Directions/instructions

Instruction and Grading:  Students’ will be graded on homework, quizzes, and tests.  Grades will be assigned on an A, B, C, D, F basis or Pass/Fail depending on the student’s IEP.


Resource Language II
6th – 8th Grade

Current Text:  Language Exercises (Steck-Vaughn Company)

Main Topics:

1.    Vocabulary
    A.    Sound words
    B.    Rhyming words
    C.    Synonyms
    D.    Antonyms
    E.    Homonyms
    F.    Multiple meanings/homographs
    G.    Prefixes and suffixes
    H.    Base and root words
    I.    Compound words
    J.    Contractions
    K.    Idioms
    L.    Connotations/denotations

2.    Sentences
    A.    Word order in sentences
    B.    Recognizing a sentence
    C.    Subjects and predicates
    D.    Types of sentences
    E.    Compound/complex sentences
    F.    Sentence combining
    G.    Run-on sentences
    H.    Independent and subordinate clauses
    I.    Compound subjects and predicates
    J.    Direct and indirect objects
    K.    Inverted word order

3.    Grammar and Usage
    A.    Common and proper nouns
    B.    Singular and plural nouns
    C.    Possessive nouns
    D.    Appositives
    E.    Verbs
    F.    Verb tense
    G.    Regular/irregular verbs
    H.    Subject/verb agreement
    I.    Verb phrases
    J.    Transitive and intransitive verbs
    K.    Verbals (gerunds, participles, and infinitives)
    L.    Active and passive voice
    M.    Mood
    N.    Pronouns
    O.    Antecedents
    P.    Articles
    Q.    Adjectives
    R.    Correct word usage
    S.    Adverbs
    T.    Prepositions
    U.    Prepositional phrases
    V.    Conjunctions
    W.    Interjections
    X.    Double negatives

4.    Capitalization and Punctuation
    A.    Capitalization (first word in sentence)
    B.    Capitalization (proper nouns)
    C.    Capitalization (in letters)
    D.    Capitalization (abbreviations)

5.    Capitalization (Titles)

6.    Capitalization  (Proper Adjectives)
    A.    End punctuation
    B.    Commas
    C.    Apostrophes in contractions
    D.    Apostrophes in possessives
    E.    Quotation marks
    F.    Colons/semicolons
    H.    Hyphens

7.    Composition
    A.    Expanding sentences
    B.    Writing a paragraph
    C.    Paragraphs (topic sentence –main idea)
    D.    Paragraphs (supporting details)
    E.    Order in paragraphs
    F.    Writing process
        •    Establishing purpose
        •    Audience
        •    Topic
        •    Outlining
        •    Clustering/brainstorming
        •    Note taking
        •    Revising/proofreading
    G.    Types of writing
        •    Poem
        •    Letter
        •    How-to paragraph
        •    Invitation
        •    Telephone message
        •    Conversation
        •    Narrative paragraph
        •    Comparing and contrasting
        •    Descriptive paragraph
        •    Report
        •    Interview
        •    Persuasive composition

8.    Readiness/Study Skills
    A.    Grouping
    B.    Letters of alphabet
    C.    Listening
    D.    Making comparisons
    E.    Organizing information
    F.    Following directions
    G.    Alphabetical order
    H.    Using a dictionary
        •    Definitions
        •    Guide words/entry words
        •    Syllables
        •    Pronunciation
        •    Multiple meanings
        •    Word origins
    I.    Parts of a book
    J.    Using the library
    K.    Using encyclopedias
    L.    Using reference books
    M.    Using the reader’s guide
    N.    Using tables charts, graphs, and diagrams
    O.    Choosing appropriate sources

Instruction and Grading:  Students’ will be graded on homework, quizzes, and tests.  Grades will be assigned on an A, B, C, D, F basis or Pass/Fail depending on the student’s IEP.


Resource Literature
6th – 8th Grade

This course is designed to instruct students’ with IEPs how to read to their fullest abilities.

Current Text:  The Focus Series (Scott Foresman)

Main Topics:

1.    Understanding What You’ve Read
    A.    Context
    B.    Setting
    C.    Cause and effect relationships
    D.    Goals and outcome
    E.    Details
    F.    Predicting outcomes

2.    Vocabulary
    A.    Word endings
    B.    Vowels
    C.    Consonants
    D.    Connecting words
    E.    Word study
    F.    Syllables
    G.    Prefixes
    H.    Suffixes
    I.    Figuring out word meaning

Instruction and Grading:  Students’ will be graded on homework, quizzes, and tests.  Grades will be assigned on an A, B, C, D, & F basis.


Resource Mathematics
6th – 8th Grade

This course is designed to instruct students’ with IEPs how mathematics concepts to their fullest abilities.

Main Topics:

1.    Whole Number Concepts and Operations
    A.    Numerations
    B.    Number Theory
    C.    Addition
    D.    Subtraction
    E.    Multiplication
    F.    Division

2.    Fraction Concepts and Operations
    A.    Concepts
    B.    Operations

3.    Decimal Concepts and Operations
    A.    Concepts
    B.    Operations

4.    Number Senses, Estimations, and Mental Math
    A.    Number sense
    B.    Estimation strategies
    C.    Mental math strategies
        •    Basic fact strategies: add and subtract
        •    Basic fact strategies: multiple and divide
        •    Mental-computation strategies

5.    Mathematical Processes
    A.    Problem-Solving
        •    Analyze word problems
        •    Analyze strategies
        •    Decision making
        •    Problem solving
        •    Guide/checklist

    B.    Reasoning
        •    Clinical thinking, logic reasoning
        •    Visual and creative thinking
    C.    Connections
        •    Curriculum connections
        •    Math strand connections
        •    Real world connections
    D.    Communications

6.    Geometry
    A.    Plane and solid shapes
    B.    Classifications
    C.    Formulas

7.    Patterns, Relationships, and Algebraic Thinking
    A.    Patterns
    B.    Relationships
    C.    Algebraic Thinking
        •    Expressions, Equations and Inequalities
        •    Integers
        •    Rational and real numbers

8.    Measurement, Time and Money
    A.    Measurement
    B.    Perimeter, Area, Volume
    C.    Time
    D.    Money

9.    Data, Statistics, and Probability
    A.    Graphing
    B.    Data and Statistics
    C.    Probability

10.    Ratio, Proportion, and Percent
    A.    Ration and Proportion
    B.    Percent

11.    Technology
    A.    Calculators
    B.    Computers

Instruction and Grading:  Students’ will be graded on homework, quizzes, and tests.  Grades will be assigned on an A, B, C, D, F basis or Pass/Fail depending on the recommendations of the IEPs.